Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 23, 2018   #1
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 3,001
Default Shikimic acid seed treatment?

Stumbled into this article and was curious if others knew about this or have any experience with it? Tempted too order some and experiment this year.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3824136/
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23, 2018   #2
Koala Doug
Tomatovillian™
 
Koala Doug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Detroit
Posts: 310
Default

A few thought popped into my head while reading that study:


* Market growers may not be able to call their crop 'organic' if that treatment is applied.

* The study was undertaken in Saudi Arabia with tomatoes grown outdoors in the field in extremely poor soil with frequent feedings with chemical fertilizers. I'm wondering how such a test would compare if done in a more hospitable environment for tomatoes. Maybe it would be the same... maybe it would be different.

* The resultant fruits are significantly more acidic (up to 66.4% more acidic, which would make the tomatoes more like lemons, PH-wise). I'm not sure if there is any benefit to a more acidic tomato.

* There does appear, at least in this one study, increased leaf growth and fruit size (as well as total number of fruit). Quite interesting.

* The n is pretty small (only forty total plants - 10 for the control and 10 each for the three application levels), so I'm pretty sure the sample size is not statistically significant.

* Since this treatment potentially affects so many aspects of the plant, could taste be affected too?


If you can find some small amount of shikimic acid for cheap, I say run a little test yourself (with a control group) and see if you can replicate some of the study's findings in your garden.


Koala Doug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23, 2018   #3
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 3,001
Default

The acid was much higher but so were the sugars, beta-carotene and all the other things that would effect flavor. What I found the most interesting is that the treatment basically made the plants way more efficient at harvesting nutrients from the soil, so in my situation (very good soil, improved for years) it stands to reason the effects could be even more pronounced. I found some 99% acid for $28 (10mg) so I may fiddle with it some if I have time.

Last edited by BigVanVader; January 23, 2018 at 01:17 PM.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23, 2018   #4
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 5,342
Default

Shikimic acid is a potent plant hormone, so I would advise not to use it in higher concentrations than what was given. Sounds like 60 ppm gave the best results. You could try it on half your seeds and then compare with the other half.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23, 2018   #5
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 3,001
Default

Yes, I will likely only do a very small test, around 10 total with 5 control and 5 treated. I just find the study results impressive. If a simple seed soak could increase production and flavor then I would think everyone would want to do it. Then again they may taste like hot garbage.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:15 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★