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Old July 13, 2017   #16
gorbelly
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I don't want any essence.Why is best practices and methods that have worked for us on heirlooms difficult to understand.Here on TV there is so much broad info. You can't find the forest for the trees.
"Best heirloom techniques"
One or two specifics that have worked very well for you.Point is to NOT get to broad.Be specific!!!
Calm down.

The issue is that different tomato varieties often benefit from different treatment. There are some broad best practices, some with many different variations for different growing areas, that work for all tomatoes... but you apparently don't want to hear those.

Maybe if you tell us which varieties you're trying to grow and what problems you're having with them, we can give you the super specific tips you desire.
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Old July 13, 2017   #17
carolyn137
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It makes absolutely no difference to me whether I've grown an heirloom variety or an F1 hybrid,or one that was bred by someone.

All are grown pretty much the same way.

Growing any one variety in subseqent years,yes,there can be and often are,differences,primarily due to weather in any one season.

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Old July 13, 2017   #18
gorbelly
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It makes absolutely no difference to me whether I've grown an heirloom variety or an F1 hybrid,or one that was bred by someone.

All are grown pretty much the same way.

Growing any one variety in subseqent years,yes,there can be and often are,differences,primarily due to weather in any one season.

Carolyn
I find there are some specifics. Like tolerating a wimpy look in wispy varieties. Or Black Krim being especially susceptible to leaf curl so making sure not to overwater thinking it's wilt. Some varieties, like Early Girl, like feet that are a little drier. Or very branchy varieties needing some pruning, even in cages. I'm finding, for example, that Earl of Edgecombe (growing it on your recommendation and very happy with it so far!) likes things more moist than average. Etc. That's really what I mean when I said "different tomato varieties often benefit from different treatment". Perhaps I should have used "considerations" rather than "treatment".

But for the most part, tomato plants are tomato plants, and what really determines any given person's best practices are the conditions of their soil and climate.
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Old July 13, 2017   #19
oakley
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I have been looking for a information bank from gardeners who grow heirloom tomatoes.Is there a location where successful heirloom gardeners share their care and prevention techniques?If not I think we surely need one.Example; preplanting methods, what goes in the planting hole, when do you start prevention techniques and what do you do, weekly care of plants; fertilization, foliar sprays, compost and just gosh darnoodley anything else.
This way we can ALL improve our techniques.I am a gardener and have no secrets on growing plante.Would be happy to share.
No secrets, no 12 step program for un-happy gardeners. Really no a-to-z start to finish
methods works for everyone. My method would not work at all in your climate, soil,
temp, prune or not, train single stem or two, cage, or not...

You need to write your own book, not literally, but find what works without falling into
massive over-information brain clogs...or clogging your soil with every mention of
another method of success from others.

Not one person here plants like I do because it has obstacles like no other. Yet I learn
from all ideas and methods...every day.

Way too many variables to give one thread of 'set-of-steps-to-follow-for-success'...
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Old July 13, 2017   #20
VC Scott
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My top 10

1. Don't water too much.
2. Don't water too little.
3. Don't fertilize too much.
4. Don't fertilize too little.
5. Don't let leaves touch the ground.
6. Don't plant outside before the last freeze.
7. Learn how to read your leaves.
8. Once tomatoes start to blush, you can pick them and let them ripen fully on your kitchen counter.
9. Never refrigerate your tomatoes.
10. Got a problem with diseases or pests? Go to the Common Garden Diseases and Pest forum and provide lots of good pictures.

Last edited by VC Scott; July 13, 2017 at 09:51 PM.
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Old July 13, 2017   #21
Starlight
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My top 10

1. Don't water too much.
2. Don't water too little.
3. Don't fertilize too much.
4. Don't fertilize too little.
5. Don't let leaves touch the ground.
6. Don't plant outside before the last freeze.
7. Learn how to read your leaves.
8. Once tomatoes start to blush, you can pick them and let them ripen fully on your kitchen counter.
9. Never refrigerate your tomatoes.
10. Got a problem with diseases or pests? Go to the Common Garden Diseases and Pest forum and provide lots of good pictures.
Well said! That about sums it up. Only thing I would add is ask questions and don't wait til you have a major problem on your hand.

I grew all heirlooms, but one this year. I was told heirlooms couldn't be grown in the South. Well the pics speak for themselves. Was 103F with heat index here still at 6pm. Besides the heat and humidity here I'm in valley of sorts and catch all the heavy morning dew.

http://tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=45405

Did I do this on my own. Nope! I haven't been at TV all that long, but am so thankful I found this site. I grow in containers as you can see. First thing I did was go to Container forum. Asked questions. Got tons of responses from all folks in different areas. I just kept trying different opinions til I found the one that worked.

When I need help with disease, fertilizing, shade, whatever stage I needed help in I just went to that forum and asked. Just had to ask the gang the other day for helping in getting my tomatoes to blush faster. They were right.

Like what was mentioned. It's not a case of growing heirlooms verses hybrids specifically, but it all in the maintaining each tomato variety and what it needs.

Some of the best and time honored growers are here on TV. Not too many tomatoes that over the years they haven't grown. There even some newer growers here that have good ideas.

What's so awesome is that folks here really care about everybody doing well and growing the best plants they can and so they will share their experiences and knowledge. Bless their little hearts they don't mind repeating over and over to each person who asks the same question. TV a hands across the world kinda place and it awesome.

Don't expect miracles overnight. I been growing a few tomatoes for many many years, but until I came to TV I never really grew tomatoes. Thanks to TV'ers I have crops of them. It's exciting and all do to them and their sharing.

Sometimes I have a failure or two. It all a learning process, but thankfully if I have a problem or question, I just ask and somebody lends a hand.

So just ask for help. Read the threads. So many good ideas and tips embedded in them along with some good friendships you can make along the way.
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Old July 14, 2017   #22
rick9748
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I really do not care to look through 600,000 post.Let's keep it simple, just best practices or successes.What YOU do to keep your heirlooms healthy and productive.Just a little tool box.This would really help me!
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Old July 14, 2017   #23
VC Scott
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OK, here is a secret. It is called Texas Tomato Food. The manufacturer is Urban Farms. Buy a gallon and give it a try. One tablespoon per gallon of water.

Plant two seedlings of the same variety. Treat them exactly the same, but give one Texas Tomato Food. You will see a difference.
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Old July 14, 2017   #24
rick9748
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Simply what have you found that works best for you.Not that complicated.
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Old July 14, 2017   #25
rick9748
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No agreement, just what you have found that works best for you.Not complicated.
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Old July 14, 2017   #26
rick9748
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Heirlooms are much more difficult to grow and keep healthy.Very much difference from hybrids.Big Beef's grow themselves Cherokee Purple DO not.They need some special care.Much difference.
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Old July 14, 2017   #27
rick9748
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KISS!
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Old July 14, 2017   #28
rick9748
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I am amazed at how complicated my simple question has become.What have you done that makes your heirlooms really happy and healthy?Not your soil, not your growing zone.Just keep it VERY SIMPLE.
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Old July 14, 2017   #29
rick9748
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I grow a variety of heirlooms here in South Carolina.Where it is hot 95+s and extremely humid all Summer.My major problem is keeping a variety of foliar diseases off my plants.Do you have a best product or variety of products that help keep disease off your heirlooms?
Any special fertilizers or foliar sprays that keep your plants healthy?
How simple can it get?
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Old July 14, 2017   #30
rick9748
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There is an extreme difference in growing a Big Beef and A Cherokee Purple.The BB will grow itself basically the CP will need a great deal of care.
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