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Old May 6, 2017   #1
Durgan
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Default 11 May 2017 Tempeh. First batch.

http://durgan.org/2017/May%202017/6%20May%202017%20NATTO/HTML/ 6 May 2017 Natto
Dried soy beans,500 ml, were processed into NATTO. The process was 500 ml of dried beans, which swell to 1000 ml with soaking, wash, soak for 12 hours, rinse, pressure cook for one hour at 15 PSI. Cool to 40C. Add and mix thoroughly one tiny measuring spoon of spores in one tablespoon of sterilized water for each 250 ml of cooked beans, so four scoops of spores in four tablespoons of water. Place beans about one inch deep in partially closed containers covered with a paper towel to absorb condensation and place in the dehydrator set at 40C for about 30 hours. Pictures depict fermentation after 24 hours. It will remain in incubator for another 6 hours then mixed together and placed in the refrigerator too age for 48 hours. A small container was filled to be used for starter for the next batch. Home-made natto might not as “sticky” as natto bought in markets, but this is still true natto.
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Old May 12, 2017   #2
Durgan
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Default 11 May 2017 Tempeh. First batch.

http://durgan.org/2017/May%202017/12...20Tempeh/HTML/ 11 May 2017 Tempeh. First batch.
Recently being introduced to Tempeh, after some preparation it was decided to initiate a setup for making the high protein food. There were several things to learn and to decide on the most convenient methods. Things to focus on are de-hulling the soy beans, making some sort of incubator in the range of 30C to 36C, how to contain the fermented product. I was not wholly without experience, since I had made Natto several times.
My system summarized is as follows. Use 500 ml of dried beans. After processing this translates into about a liter. De-hull the beans by boiling for 30 minutes and rubbing between the hands about six times draining the hulls away periodically. Pressure cook for 45 minutes.
Cool the beans to 40C add two tablespoons of white vinegar as a spore catalyst, add the spores (3g) and mix thoroughly. Place the prepared beans in containers of choice. The finished material sticks to anything. I chose open mesh containers (Bed and Beyond) lined with 100% cotton flour cloth from Walmart. The beans must have some access to air to ferment properly.
For an incubator I used a body heating pad in a 22 liter bucket (Winee trade) with a stand set above to place the fermenting containers. I placed a LED lamp on top for a bit of control by installing a plug in dimmer. I needed a bit more heat than what the heating pad supplied to get about 32C. A temperature of 30C to 36C is required. My dehydrator will not go as low as 30C.
The fermentation was highly successful. All four of my containers produced quality tempeh. This is the raw product and it need be cooked. I sliced four piece off the main block and fried them in butter and served with a touch of soy sauce. This was my first attempt at making this product. Pictures depict the method in some detail.
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Old May 13, 2017   #3
Durgan
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Default 13 May 2017 Cooking Tempeh

http://durgan.org/2017/May%202017/13...20Tempeh/HTML/ 13 May 2017 Cooking Tempeh
After producing tempeh it should be cooked prior to using it in various recipes. Two methods are shown. In each case the block of tempeh which has been residing in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 24 hours is sliced into serving size pieces. One block was fried in butter, browning both sides of the slice. The other block was sliced and steam cooked for 20 minutes. After cooking the tempeh may be served as per various recipes available on the internet. I tested as is and found either to e remarkably filling.
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Old May 16, 2017   #4
Durgan
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Default 14 May 2017 Making Tempeh Starter

14 May 2017 Making Tempeh Starter
Posted on May 16, 2017 by Durgan
http://durgan.org/2017/May%202017/14%20May%202017%20Making%20Tempeh%20Starter/HTML/index.htm 14 May 2017 Making Tempeh Starter
Finding commercial supplier prices for starter spores to be outrageous, it was decided try and make my own from a previous batch of Tempeh. Procedure was to allow a block to ferment longer and form dark areas which are the desired spores. This block was then cut into small pieces and dehydrated at 36C until very dry. Then the dried pieces were made as fine as possible in a blender and coffee grinder. The resultant powder was then mixed with rice flour as a storage substrate. The amount of rice flour added was twice the weight of the dehydrated spores. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for few days or the freezer for long term. The material must be completely dry to prevent mold. The dehydrating temperature should not exceed 36C to avoid destroying the spores. Instead of rice flour for a storage substrate soy flour might be used. Application is three teaspoons of Tempeh Starter to 500 ml of dried soy beans.


This is tempeh made from the home starter produced. It is a perfect run. This means tempeh may be made without using expensive commercial starter. This batch was fermented 36 hours. I am a happy traveler.
http://durgan.org/2017/May%202017/16%20May%202016%20Tempeh%20from%20home%20spores/HTML/ 16 May 2016 Tempeh from home spores
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Old June 10, 2017   #5
Durgan
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Default 10 June 2017 Tempeh Starter (Simplified)

http://durgan.org/2017/June%202017/1...0Starter/HTML/ 10 June 2017 Tempeh Starter
After each batch of temper is made a piece is allowed to ferment double time or about 40 hours. It forms black areas which are the starter spores. Then cut into small pieces and allowed to air dry or placed in the dehydrator at about 35C to completely dry. When dry it is ground as small as possible in a coffee grinder. The powder is then placed in a sealed jar and stored in the refrigerator until required. Three teaspoons are used for a half liter of dried soy beans. Storage time has not been ascertained. This procedure means the maker of the tempeh is independent of commercial starter.
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Old July 3, 2017   #6
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Default 3 July 2017 Tempeh

http://durgan.org/2017/July%202017/3%20July%202017%20Tempeh/HTML/index.htm 3 July 2017 Tempeh
Batch made on 3 July 2017. The starter was from the previous batch.
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Old July 7, 2017   #7
Durgan
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Default 7 July 2017 Tempeh

7 July 2017 Tempeh

Posted on July 7, 2017 by Durgan
http://durgan.org/2017/July%202017/7...20Tempeh/HTML/ 7 July 2017 Tempeh
I ordered one kilogram of tempeh starter from http://tempehstarter.com/catalog/ind...eb97a2f897ebd2 in Indonesia. Cost about 75 dollars including shipping.
The first batch of one half liter of dried of soy beans were made into perfect tempeh. One kilogram of starter is enough to process over 200 liters of tempeh.
Half a liter of dried soy beans were washed and then boiled for about 30 minutes, then skins removed by rubbing between the hands, and the skins poured off about 5 times to remove completely. The beans were then pressure cooked for 30 minutes at 15 PSI. Beans were allowed to cool to room temperature. A large tablespoon of vinegar was added to lower pH and mixed, then one teaspoon of powdered Starter was added and mixed thoroughly.
The prepared beans were then placed in three open containers in a sterilized cotton damp clothe to main some humidity. The containers were then placed in a 5 gallon bucket which has a body heater in the bottom with an LED lamp at the top with a dimmer to control the temperature around 31C. Incubation was ~30 hours which produced perfect tempeh. The following pictures depict the process.
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Old July 9, 2017   #8
Durgan
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7 July 2017 Tempeh

Posted on July 7, 2017 by Durgan
http://durgan.org/2017/July%202017/7...20Tempeh/HTML/ 7 July 2017 Tempeh
I ordered one kilogram of tempeh starter from http://tempehstarter.com/catalog/ind...eb97a2f897ebd2 in Indonesia. Cost about 75 dollars including shipping.
The first batch of one half liter of dried of soy beans were made into perfect tempeh. One kilogram of starter is enough to process over 200 liters of tempeh.
Half a liter of dried soy beans were washed and then boiled for about 30 minutes, then skins removed by rubbing between the hands, and the skins poured off about 5 times to remove completely. The beans were then pressure cooked for 30 minutes at 15 PSI. Beans were allowed to cool to room temperature. A large tablespoon of vinegar was added to lower pH and mixed, then one teaspoon of powdered Starter was added and mixed thoroughly.
The prepared beans were then placed in three open containers in a sterilized cotton damp clothe to main some humidity. The containers were then placed in a 5 gallon bucket which has a body heater in the bottom with an LED lamp at the top with a dimmer to control the temperature around 31C. Incubation was ~30 hours which produced perfect tempeh. The following pictures depict the process.

Second Batch made with Tempeh Starter Raprima. (Rhizopus Oligosporus) from Indonesia.
http://durgan.org/2017/July%202017/9...20Tempeh/HTML/ 9 July 2017 Tempeh
My second batch of tempeh was made using starter from Indonesia. Fementation was only 18 hours for excellent tempeh. This is far superior to using starter from a previous batch.
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