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Old February 10, 2013   #1
lakelady
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Default Peruvian Popping Beans

I've heard a little about these beans and thought it would be fun to grow some for "popping" like corn. However, what I am reading is that they are not available anywhere in the US due to some patent issue. With all of the seed savers we've got, I just find it hard to believe no one has any popping beans?

Maybe I'm just not searching correctly, but if someone can point me to the right website, that would be great, thanks!
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Old February 10, 2013   #2
habitat_gardener
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I read about popbeans in Carol Deppe's book The Resilient Gardener. The specific one she mentions is a garbanzo, Hannan Popbean. She writes that she discussed the selection process in her previous book (on breeding veg varieties), and that she expected to release Hannan Popbean in fall 2010 at Fertile Valley Seeds. But the website hasn't been updated so you'll have to email her.
http://www.caroldeppe.com/fertileval.../fvsindex.html

added: I see that nunas are an entirely different kind of bean and require short daylength. It's astounding that they're available only in the Andes!
http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=1398&page=177

Last edited by habitat_gardener; February 10, 2013 at 11:59 PM.
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Old February 12, 2013   #3
Zeedman
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Popping beans (Nunas) are Phaseolus vulgaris, just like common beans... but yes, they are short-day plants. In most of the Temperate Zone, that means they don't flower until the equinox, around mid-September. That's too close to frost for most of us to get seed. I've grown a few legumes here that were daylength sensitive, such as rice bean, hyacinth bean, and some tropical yardlongs... they got luxurious growth, flowered late, even gave me a few immature pods to sample, but get no ripe beans.

There were (and probably still are) breeding projects to develop day-neutral Nunas, and there are already cultivars out there... but they are all patented, and heavily controlled. From what I've read, they are tied up in litigation over indigenous property rights. I know someone who grows them, but the Material Transfer Agreement prohibits them from sharing seed.

Pretty sad, when a product of conventional breeding - developed in a Land Grant institution, supported by our tax dollars - is as tightly controlled as a GMO. Especially when so many gardeners would be interested in them, were they to be made available. I wonder if they ever will be???
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Old February 12, 2013   #4
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Jim Myers at OSU has several lines of bush beans with the Nuña traits. I've grown them for about 6 years now after signing an MTA that I would not share the beans. Long story short, the patent is probably breakable based on pre-existing art, but nobody has an incentive to challenge it in court.

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Old February 12, 2013   #5
Crandrew
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Open Source Seeds?
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Old February 19, 2013   #6
lakelady
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it just seems so silly to me that if these are beans that have been growing for probably hundreds of years in South America, we can't get them here because of these patents and controls. Maybe they would not grow here, but it would be fun to try at least. Wish I knew someone from Peru. I used to actually, about 20 years ago, but that won't help me now.

I just thought it would be a really neat "snack food" full of protein that could be great for the boys (and myself of course). oh well.
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Old February 20, 2013   #7
Darren Abbey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakelady View Post
I just thought it would be a really neat "snack food" full of protein that could be great for the boys (and myself of course). oh well.
This is exactly why some 'inventor' patented them. The 'invention' has been tied up in international legal disputes ever since then, since the proper rights-holders (Peruvian Indigenes & organizations) didn't exactly like their potential new trade crop (to US snack consumers) getting patented by someone else.
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Old February 20, 2013   #8
lakelady
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ah ha, now it all makes sense! thanks
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Old February 21, 2013   #9
janezee
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Funny, I just got this yesterday from Carol, before I saw this thread.

j


Quote:
‘HANNAN POPBEAN’ (garbanzo a.k.a. chickpea; Cicer arietinum) Plant mid-March through April. Photoperiod sensitive. Later plantings give flowering on tiny plants, thus produce few seeds. Seedlings are freeze-hardy. Plant at or thin to 8 inches. Needs no irrigation in the maritime Northwest. Harvest when plants are dry, usually late July to early August. I don't recommend this variety for regions where the ground is frozen into April. Selected for production under organic conditions in Willamette Valley Oregon, hotbed of aphid-spread pea diseases. Highly resistant to soil borne diseases including Fusarium and to aphid-borne diseases. Use as a regular garbanzo or as a popbean. Bred by Carol Deppe. About 100 seeds – $5.


Carol Deppe/Fertile Valley Seeds 2013 SEED LIST
(To be on the mailing list for my email seed list email your request to
resilientgardener@comcast.net .)
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Old February 21, 2013   #10
Zeedman
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It would be interesting to know how different "Hannan" is from the brown-seeded PI 374085 ("Brown Popping") Carol mentioned in her previous book. I've grow that one for years; the description of the growth habit for "Hannan" matches what I've observed from "Brown Popping". At least now I know why the bushes were so short last year; I direct seeded late, as opposed to starting early as transplants. Garbanzos are poorly adapted to my climate anyway... I get enough to share seed, but not enough to eat in any quantity.
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Old June 23, 2014   #11
LDiane
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I asked about them in Ecuador, but no one I asked knew about them.
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