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Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

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Old February 1, 2017   #1
LoreD
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Default 18th century recipes youtube channel

I love this channel. They show 18th century food preparation and preserving food. They do it in full costume over a wood fire. They did deviate once by showing how to make 18th century beef broth cubes in a slow cooker.★

They also showed different methods that were used to preserve eggs.

They even have videos about 18th century methods of making earthen and mud ovens.

https://m.youtube.com/user/jastownsendandson
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Old February 2, 2017   #2
MissMoustache
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Cool!
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Old February 2, 2017   #3
NarnianGarden
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Wow. However: I'd love to know how to apply 18th century recipes in modern times, i.e., how to use an electric oven at which temperature etc...

Some people in my country have a traditional baking oven that functions with chopped wood as its fuel. It's a wonderful heating system for a large house and it can be used for many dishes, casseroles, stews, not only bread ... (yes, very unpopular among the new green hippie generation... supposedly sooo unecological etc... I am glad there is no EU dircetive yet to ban them from households!)
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Old February 2, 2017   #4
LoreD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NarnianGarden View Post
Wow. However: I'd love to know how to apply 18th century recipes in modern times, i.e., how to use an electric oven at which temperature etc...

Some people in my country have a traditional baking oven that functions with chopped wood as its fuel. It's a wonderful heating system for a large house and it can be used for many dishes, casseroles, stews, not only bread ... (yes, very unpopular among the new green hippie generation... supposedly sooo unecological etc... I am glad there is no EU dircetive yet to ban them from households!)

I found the recipes to be pretty unusual. Most of them were cooked in a pot over an open fire. I think cooking on an electric stove would be pretty much the same, The baked recipes, I usually go with 375-400 degrees. Most baked goods are about that temp. Since most of the baked goods were baked in wood ovens; I don't think people were that picky about temps.

I thought some of the recipes were pretty interesting, like the potato cheesecake, paw paw pudding, and pickled red cabbage.

He, also, had videos about building bread ovens out of mud. He said they could be built in one day.

You might have some difficulty getting some of the ingredients, like okra, but it might be a good excuse to start growing it yourself.

I think the videos are fun and educational to watch. You can click the subscribe button and new videos will be sent to you.
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Last edited by LoreD; February 2, 2017 at 05:45 PM.
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