Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Forum area for discussing hybridizing tomatoes in technical terms and information pertinent to trait/variety specific long-term (1+ years) growout projects.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 6 Days Ago   #1
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default Whiskeyjack F2 - Canada 150

This was my best surprise of the 2017 season.
From a cross of two F2's in 2015, red and orange-red, I selected a very tasty red plum in the F1 2016 to grow forward. I had completely forgotten the lone gf allele from Indian Stripe in one of the original crosses. So imagine my shock when the earliest flower opened with all the characteristics of a black. Sure enough, the plant ripened a black heart, just 93 days from seed.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg whiskeyjack-flrsfruit.JPG (257.2 KB, 45 views)
File Type: jpg whiskeyjackF2-firstfruit.jpg (254.0 KB, 45 views)
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #2
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default

Coincidentally to giving the name "Whiskeyjack" to this line, I learned that a cross Canada vote organized by Canadian Geographic had chosen the Whiskeyjack to be Canada's national bird. It isn't official (but may be some day), but it got me thinking about Canada's 150 celebration, and the Canadian roots of my new tomato, whose earliness comes from the maternal DNA of Kimberley. I thought wouldn't it be cool to celebrate Canada's anniversary by sharing the F3 seed across Canada, so the tomato could be locally adapted across our nation just as the Whiskeyjack bird is. If we end up with more than one stable OP "Whiskeyjack" they could be distinguished by adding the grower's name or place. And of course, anyone is welcome to use this line for your own breeding work to create other varieties.

So this thread will begin by sharing information with my fellow Whiskeyjack growers about the lineage and what to expect in segregation, and is also a place for anyone to post their results down the line.
What is really special about the Whiskeyjack to me? It's one of, if not the earliest fruit I've ever grown. It's larger than any of the other early blacks I've been working on. And the fruit was very sweet, as well as being smooth textured and thin skinned. My taste testers rated it above the other blacks this year, every time.
Here's a pic of Whiskeyjack with some of my other early blacks for size comparison. The first fruit weighed 125 g, so about a quarter pound.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg earlyblacks-2017.JPG (302.0 KB, 43 views)
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #3
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default

The yield of the plant was also decent, with 4-6 fruit per cluster and large enough to meet my benchmark of a pound per cluster.
Some weights from my notebook give a range of 66 g to 189 g.
I didn't prune and let the plant ramble on the hopes of more fruit, of course! Some fruit that were close to the glass (and temperature extremes there) unfortunately split, so this is one tendency to watch out for in future. There is no significant tendency to splitting in the parent lines that I have noticed.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Whiskeyjacks-onthevine.JPG (403.3 KB, 44 views)
File Type: jpg whiskeyjace-split-nextglass.JPG (198.5 KB, 43 views)
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #4
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default earliness in Whiskeyjack, parents and siblings

In the past couple of seasons I've been giving more thought to the maternal DNA lineages in my crosses, due to reading some work that suggested earliness (and some other important traits) were more easily recovered if the trait was maternal. My own results may tend to agree with this, as I seem to have lost Kimberley's earliness when I crossed the same line to Medovaya Kaplya (MK mother) which was easy to recover in the original cross with Zolotye Kupola.

It is especially easy to select earliness from the Kimberley lines, because much of it comes from the genetics of precocious flowering. As you can see in the table below, Kimberley and her early offspring flower much earlier than the typical tomato, at around 45 days. This means you can identify the trait at planting time, and it is worthwhile to grow some extra seedlings every generation just to make sure the earliness is recovered - if it matters to you. It does for us, because we have such a short season.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg whiskeyjack-datatable.jpg (73.0 KB, 43 views)
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #5
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default other recessive traits that could show up

I guess I should mention the recessive traits which are listed in the last column, and could still show up in F3.

Yellow, if still present, would produce a green-when-ripe. I think this is unlikely because I didn't see any yellow in later generations of Hope's Early, but it's still possible it was present in the F2.

Semi-determinate is quite unlikely, because it is linked to the Beta orange gene. I selected away from that when I chose the Winter Plum F1 (no Beta).

PL is certainly possible, maybe most likely of all, since there were PL siblings of Whiskeyjack F2, which is RL wispy. I selected RL-wispy seedlings in the F2, because I am not a big fan of wispy PL. Why because it makes it more difficult to identify a problem when the leaves are curly and droopy anyway. I'm always thinking the plant looks like hell when they are perfectly happy, as I learned from growing the mother line "Hope's Early". Some find it pretty, and I guess at its best it can look a bit like curly hair 'ringlets'. But wispy-RL at least in these lines looks a bit more robust for my liking. Here's a pic of two Hope's Early plants to give you an idea of that wispy PL foliage "look".
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HopesEarly-wispyPL.JPG (326.9 KB, 44 views)
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #6
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default

Well I have to go to work now, so will post more later about shape, size, taste etc.
I am expecting lots of shape variation into F3 and beyond, because this is what I'm seeing in parent and sibling lines.

The Whiskeyjack F2 could be described as a blunt heart with a strong tendency to produce doubles. I regret I didn't get a pic of some that looked truly valentine heart shaped, there were a few. For now here's a pic of a juicy double sliced, and a shot of the two sibling shapes - Robins Nest top left and Winter Plum, which was most like the mother F1, bottom left.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Whiskeyjack-juicy.JPG (175.6 KB, 44 views)
File Type: jpg whiskeyjack-and-sibs.JPG (190.1 KB, 42 views)
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #7
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,075
Default

it is a beautiful color. how does it taste?
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #8
KarenO
Tomatovillian™
 
KarenO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 3,862
Default

Great name. . Will be fun to watch your project unfold. Looks like a beautiful tomato
Bower
KarenO
KarenO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6 Days Ago   #9
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,371
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
it is a beautiful color. how does it taste?
They were really sweet.
From what I've read about tomato taste, sweetness also brings out other flavors. Maybe this is why I only like sweet fruit now, as I've gotten a bit jaded with tomato taste.

I always get some tasters in to give a verdict. The Whiskeyjack scored every time.

The other two F2 fruits that I grew were each very different tasting. The large red I called Robins Nest has a classic red tomato taste with lots of umami and a very tangy finish. The smaller one Winter Plum didn't produce many fruit but they were really outstanding - sweet and very complex. I think they were better tasting than Whiskeyjack, although I usually pick blacks over reds... go figure.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5 Days Ago   #10
sirtanon
Tomatovillian™
 
sirtanon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Phoenix, AZ (zone 9b)
Posts: 681
Default

I'm looking forward to hearing more about this project. Looks quite interesting, and sounds like flavor is a winner too. Also, I love the color on those dark hearts.
__________________
I could sail by on the winds of silence, and maybe they won't notice... but this time I think it would be better if I swim..
sirtanon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:13 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★