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Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

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Old June 4, 2013   #31
Durgan
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Originally Posted by Tormato View Post
How about rhubarb/stevia or rhubarb/honey?
The sweeteners are all the same, just degrees of harm. In most diets particularly Western, people get more than enough sugar and all its substitutes in their food. There is absolutely no valid reason for adding extra. My opinion.
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Old June 4, 2013   #32
Redbaron
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The sweeteners are all the same, just degrees of harm. In most diets particularly Western, people get more than enough sugar and all its substitutes in their food. There is absolutely no valid reason for adding extra. My opinion.
I agree with most of what you said Durgan, but stevia is an herb. No harm in plucking off a few leaves and adding it to a juice, much like adding mint. BTW mint might be nice too!

Just a thought.
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Old June 4, 2013   #33
Durgan
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I agree with most of what you said Durgan, but stevia is an herb. No harm in plucking off a few leaves and adding it to a juice, much like adding mint. BTW mint might be nice too!

Just a thought.
I grew stevia and used it for awhile. I found it almost useless. Much over hyped. Actually it is rather delicate to grow.

With the rhubarb I just drink a glass and imagine I am being exposed to some quality food. Who knows?
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Old June 6, 2013   #34
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I love your posts, Durgan. I love rhubarb pie but never thought of using the juice, the pineapple mix sounds like a great idea.
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Old June 6, 2013   #35
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I hear ya, Durgan.

But then, I'm awaiting my yearly "fix" of sweet corn in August, after eleven months of withdrawal.

Trmat
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Old June 6, 2013   #36
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Rhubarb and ginger jam is my favorite use, in fact have just split one plant into four so there will e more to use in a couple of years, and I have no problem with the extra sugar as I don't eat it that often.
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Old June 17, 2013   #37
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Default Green Produce Juice

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?OFQLU 17 June 2013 Green Produce Juice
Juice was made from the green produce in the garden, romaine lettuce,broccoli,pak choi, some kale, chives, mint, dill, radish.The broccoli was starting to bolt. The produces was cut into small pieces and cooked and made into slurry.The produce was covered with water about six litres for processing. The cooked product was put through a food mill strainer, then the residue of the straining was put through a Champion juicer to extract most of the nutrients.Six litres of juice was obtained and this was pressure canned at 15 PSI for 15 minutes for long term storage at room temperature. Pictures depict the process.
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Old June 17, 2013   #38
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Did you know you can make muffins from the leftover pulp?
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Old June 17, 2013   #39
Durgan
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Did you know you can make muffins from the leftover pulp?
That discard is pretty rough. No need to feel guilty throwing the final filtering from the Champion Juicer out. It is devoid of nutrients and a bit rough for the human digestive system. For my starch, I make pilot bread of various types.
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Old June 21, 2013   #40
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Default Vegetable Juicing

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?UBAMR 21 June 2013 Vegetable Juicing
The green vegetables in the garden were ready for using. Vegetables used,tomatoes, romaine lettuce, pak choi,kale, collards, mint, onion, chives,basil,dill.Everything available was made into a juice and pressure canned for long term storage at room temperature.All the vegetables were washed, cut into small pieces, cooked, and blended into a slurry.The slurry was put through a food mill, then the residue of the food mill was put through a Champion juicer. Seven litres of juice was obtained and was pressure canned at 15 PSI for 15 minutes. Pictures depict the process.
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Old July 1, 2013   #41
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Default Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis) Identification

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?NREJG 1 July 2013 Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis) Identification

Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis) is relatively common in my area, growing along side roads. The large, palm size flowers are easy to spot, and I mark them for future picking of the berries during the first week of September.The bushes with berries when ripe fade into the background vegetation and are difficult to see. The berries must be very dark almost black for consumption. Never eat any red berries. Be sure of your identification. The saw tooth leaves, and flat plane flowers, and almost palm size flowers are are easy to identify.I make juice from the berries usually around 60 litres if I can get enough berries.Two pounds of berries are required to make one litre of juice. http://www.durgan.org/URL/?TPVRN 26 August 2012 Elderberry Juice
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Old July 8, 2013   #42
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Wow, this seems like so much work.
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Old July 11, 2013   #43
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That just sounds healthy and delicious!
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Old July 15, 2013   #44
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Default Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L)

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L) is abundant in my garden this year, so 40 litres was harvested and 25 made into juice and about 15 was dehydrated. The plants were cut at ground level to eliminate the root and associated soil.The juice is simple to make, since it only had to be blended into a slurry, since the plant has almost no coarse cellulose. The dehydrated plant material will be utilized as a drink or soup base. Apparently this ubiquitous weed has many desirable nutrients.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?IUQUU 14 July 2013 Purslane Juice Pictures depicting the juicing process.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?VPOEH
14 July 2013 Purslane Dehydrated Pictures depicing the dehydrating process.
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Old July 15, 2013   #45
Darren Abbey
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I've used the plant as a potherb, either boiling it or sautéing it lightly. It never occurred to me that one could make a juice from it.
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