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Old August 15, 2011   #31
TZ-OH6
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I found it easier to quikly blister them with a hot fire of small sticks (kindling) rather than coals (it also gives them smoky flavor). I then freeze without any skinning/seeding because the skin helps keep them from sticking much when frozen and its easy to skin and seed them when they are thawing out.
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Old August 15, 2011   #32
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdvpc View Post
There is no variety of green chile called Hatch. Hatch is a town in the Mesilla Valley about 90 minutes drive from where I live-lots of different varieties are grown there-Big Jim, Joe Parker, Sandia, etc. The problem is, the supermarkets call them Hatch Chiles.
I know that, you know that, but the problem is many people distinguish the pepper as Hatch.
I always called them Anaheim chili's or New Mexico chili's as I think of all peppers as chili's.
Its always a big deal around here this time of year for the so called Hatch chili's.

That is why I called them Hatch chili's, for the benefit of the uninformed and tourist.

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Old August 16, 2011   #33
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Originally Posted by mdvpc View Post
This is more or less what I did last year for various chile types including Big Jim with great results, but I did not cut them open before roasting in the oven. Did that after roasting. Broiler was set to low, after positioning that top oven rack very close to the top element.

About 5-7 min on each side if memory serves (I used tongs to turn), just until they were well blistered but not burnt. Then I wrapped in foil with moistened paper towels for a while to sweat them.

After sweated/cool enough to handle, I cut lengthwise on one side with a paring knife and scraped out seeds with a spoon. Then I used the paring knife and my hands in rubber gloves to remove the skin. Most of them went into a freezer bag and into the freezer for later. (I did a quick freeze on a baking sheet before bagging, so they would not stick together) Some were left in the fridge for fresh eating over the next few days.

Great to have some nice roasted chiles put up in the freezer ready to use throughout the year, as you know, Michael.

Edit/add - we roasted several chiles on the grill last year too, which also works well. But IMO, the oven can be easier/quicker and a bit more uniform in results.

We also slow roasted several chiles on the smoker, which were quite nice and the end flavor was very intense and chipotle-like. I'm no purist, and only have one smoker. Those who are really into the slow roasting of chiles frequently have a dedicated smoker that is only used for that purpose. If a little meat flavor gets in there while I'm slow roasting chiles, oh well.
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Old August 16, 2011   #34
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The problem is, when they call them Hatch Chiles, you dont know how hot they are. Sandia are so hot, even my wife cant eat them, and she can stand a real hot chile. If you ask the folks at the store what variety it is, they have no idea.

Suze-looks good-you did a great job.
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Old August 16, 2011   #35
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For many vegetables in the store they have no idea what they are.

I think they are growing a different variety of chilli for the stores than they did years ago. The ones in the 80's had a really thick skin compared to the chilli's they sell today.

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Old August 17, 2011   #36
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Hey from sunny SC! Just wanted to quickly respond to all the good ideas. I have bookmarked and printed off the link you sent, mdvpc. Great information and I know I will use it again next time.

Worth, I believe we could start a truck farming operation if you will meet me half way with a load of 75 cent peppers.......they are 3.98 in the grocery store here!

Structure, have found a recipe for "Ajvar"....it sounds good and plan to make it tomorrow. If you want seeds, let me know and I will send some. They could be mixed as they were beside the cayenne and jalapenos.

Lurley, we use canned green chillies and pimentos all the time. Thanks for letting me know that I can put some up in small jelly jars. Will try your recipe for the strips when it cools down a little bit.

Suze, thanks for posting the pictures and am going to try doing the peppers in the oven on low broil this afternoon. It will be a lot cooler and I won't be battling mosquitoes while I cook. I gathered 15 pounds this morning!

Nana, am pickling cayenne in a few days, so will try pickling some of the chilies then. Sounds like a great idea.

Off to get some of this work done........:-) Take care, Sandy
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Old August 18, 2011   #37
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Used to get 50# burlap bags from NM of green chilies...A lot of work but so worth it ! One year the chilies were unreal hot...Michael, I am thinking they were sandias now...I remember the guy who gave them to us, claimed his dad would not eat them they were so hot...Green chilies give the most incredible flavor to food though...We would roast, peel, and freeze...

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Old August 20, 2011   #38
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Default Italian Frying Peppers

What's my best bet for preserving Italian frying peppers - like Jimmy Nardello or Fred's Dolce di Minervino? In the past my harvests have been so meager that I was able to use them before it became an issue. The crop's much better this year, but after a few days on the counter, they get a bit limp.
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Old August 20, 2011   #39
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I prefer to freeze them because there is no blanching. Just open the bag and take out what you need and return the bag to the freezer...

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Old August 21, 2011   #40
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You can also dry them and then fry them from their dry state, a more intensely flavored option because of the lack of water
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Old August 21, 2011   #41
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Montanamato: That's easier than I expected!

Lurley: Do you think they would air dry well in our Midwest climate, or would I need a dehydrator?
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Old August 22, 2011   #42
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It depends on how thick the flesh is for me. Thin fleshed ones I can usually string up in bunches and hang somewhere warm but dry. My patio room or garage work for this, tho in the garage I cover them with paper bag to keep insects from landing on them. Putting them on screens over sawhorses or something like that and covering with newspapers or another layer of screen works also. For thicker fleshed varieties, I cut a few slits in the side to help moisture escape during drying and put them in the dehydrator or the oven on its lowest setting. My new oven actually has a dehydrate setting so I'll have to see how it works soon. I usually go with the dehydrator or oven method as our weather in August is usually too humid, last year with the drought was an exception, hot and dry it was pretty perfect for doing it in the garage.
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Old October 17, 2011   #43
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Default Extra hot peppers

I grow Serranos to make hot pepper jelly, and also some jalapenos for salsa or stuffing. But now, at the end of the season, I have extra, especially red ones. I can only make so much pepper jelly.

The thing is - these are really HOT. Jalapeno M sure is a hot thing, I almost killed some guests with my salsa. One pepper was mellow, first batch of salsa, the next pretty lethal.

So I'm trying to decide what to do with the extra ones - freeze them maybe? How - cut up, or...? I don't think I'd want to pickle them, I think they'd be too hot for anyone to eat them.
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Old October 17, 2011   #44
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if you pickle them in a sweet brine it will tone the heat WAY down... my mom does some of my jalapenos each year in cider vinegar, sugar, pickling spice, turmeric and celery salt...

when i freeze mine i like to chop them prior so they are ready to just be dumped into whatever recipe i'm using them in.
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Old October 17, 2011   #45
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i have frozen a ton of hot peppers this year. you could make hot sauce too.

tom
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