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Old August 13, 2014   #1
snugglekitten
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Default Grafting with other Solanaceae

Anyone brave such an experiment or have data on someone that has?

Potatoes?
Henbane?
Jimson weed?


Best regards,
SK
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Old August 13, 2014   #2
Tom Wagner
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I have an ongoing experiment with potato seedlings grafted onto tomato rootstocks, and a more limited tomatoes grafted onto potato seedling rootstocks.

My potato seedlings grafted onto tomatoes are still growing as perennials since October.
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Old August 13, 2014   #3
Darren Abbey
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I have an ongoing experiment with potato seedlings grafted onto tomato rootstocks, and a more limited tomatoes grafted onto potato seedling rootstocks.
What is the motivation of potatoes on tomato rootstocks? selecting for flower/seed production?
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Old August 13, 2014   #4
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Do not use Jimson weed!!!!! It was one of the first tried grafting stocks in the 20's, down here in the Southeastern states. Though it produced great plant, the fruit would build up poison.

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Old August 14, 2014   #5
Tom Wagner
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Quote:
What is the motivation of potatoes on tomato rootstocks? selecting for flower/seed production?
The first round of grafting was to mimic the Thompson & Morgan hand-grafted plants producing potatoes and tomatoes at the same time with its new TomTato. Although the first attempt did, in fact, produce tomatoes and potatoes at the same time ii was done in one gallon containers and I think the results were a bit underwhelming.

The second round of grafting was done with my suggestion to get the potatoes to bloom and bloom over a long time as most potatoes die down about the time of potato berry maturity. Many other promising research agendas from the grafts are on-going.
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Old August 14, 2014   #6
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I've seen somewhere that somebody was using eggplant. That would make sense in a hotter climate I assume.
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Old August 14, 2014   #7
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www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=32878

I have a theory that if the above-ground Jimson Weed growth was kept trimmed away, then the tomatoes would not be toxic. But I don't have a lab to test my results, so I didn't try it.

The Jimson Weed patch in the cow field behind my house is an 8' tall jungle. The roots over-winter, which is why it comes back so ferociously. I think an established patch of ground with a Jimson Weed root system in place would grow the biggest tomato plants I have ever seen.
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Old August 15, 2014   #8
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www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=32878

I have a theory that if the above-ground Jimson Weed growth was kept trimmed away, then the tomatoes would not be toxic. But I don't have a lab to test my results, so I didn't try it.

The Jimson Weed patch in the cow field behind my house is an 8' tall jungle. The roots over-winter, which is why it comes back so ferociously. I think an established patch of ground with a Jimson Weed root system in place would grow the biggest tomato plants I have ever seen.
Thanks for the link, and thanks for the information, Tom, Cole, et all.

I would like to try henbane because the of the outrageous root system, so if anyone has a hint of where to get the seed (and assuming its legal in EU/USA) please let me know.

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Old August 15, 2014   #9
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http://companionplants.com/catalog/p...a6ab4700884ccc
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Old August 16, 2014   #10
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An important witch plant - reported side effects have included insanity and death.
Witch plants are hardcore.

Don't try this one at home, kids.

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Old August 16, 2014   #11
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it's so crazy that the same family of plants that potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants belong to also includes such deadly toxin producers! i can remember as a teen seeing a "shocking" news story on a tabloid show about jimson weed, supposedly the "new way kids are getting high" i can remember trying to find some to trip on, as that was the mindset i had as a teen, always looking for shrooms and the like. all i had to go on was the encyclopedia entry on jimson weed, luckily i never found any, i'm almost certain i wouldn't be the same if i had survived.
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Old August 17, 2014   #12
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Tomatoes are the exception to the rule.


Tobacco is the world's most consumbed stimulant.
Potatoes are toxic when consumed raw.
The other solanaceae don't have a stellar reputation.
Even the leaves of tomato plants are toxic.


Its actually pretty logical that Europeans where whigged out about consuming tomatoes for so long, given the generally high level of botanical knowledge back then.


Jamestown was supposed to be a giant tobacco plantation and its interesting that the pilgrims were getting wasted on Jimson weed during the long, dismal winter hours.

Kinda puts Salem into perspective.

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Old August 18, 2014   #13
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Have you thought of trying The ‘Devil Plant’ Solanum capsicoides, or
Solanum quitoense, known as naranjilla.
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Old August 18, 2014   #14
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Have you thought of trying The ‘Devil Plant’ Solanum capsicoides, or
Solanum quitoense, known as naranjilla.
Mad
No,

Actually I can't believe how we moderns are in such shock that Europeans didn't eat this fruit for several hundred years.

Solonaceae are a veritable snakespit of toxic alkaloids.
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Old August 26, 2014   #15
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I've got a handful of tomato grafts growing this year on Black Beauty Eggplant (Solanum melongena) and Gbogname (S. Macrocarpon). While there are several potentially confounding factors (timing, soil, graft quality), performance on both has been extremely poor. Flavor doesn't seem to be adversely affected, but the plants on both are stunted and the fruits are small and scarce. It hasn't been a very encouraging experiment. By contrast, the couple dozen grafts I have on the commercial rootstock Multifort (S. lycopersicum × S. habrochaites) are generally doing better than the same varieties on their own roots.
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