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Old December 29, 2015   #1
LoreD
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Default Craig's Straw bale book has been released!

Craig's book is on Amazon!

Growing Vegetables in Straw Bales: Easy Planting, Less Weeding, Early Harvests. A Storey BASICS® Title

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/161212...ig+le+houllier
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Old December 29, 2015   #2
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I got it last week, read it-its great!
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Old December 29, 2015   #3
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Thanks, folks - yes, according to Amazon, it is out. I also have a case of them - if anyone wants a signed copy, let me know and we can work out the particulars. Go forth and review if you wish!
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Old December 29, 2015   #4
heirloomtomaguy
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Congrats Craig on your new release
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Old January 23, 2016   #5
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Hey folks - yes, the little Storey Basics Straw Bale book I wrote is indeed now "out there". If you are so inclined, and like the book (or don't like it for that matter), it can use some Amazon review "help".

I am in a bit of a kerfuffle with the author of the previous (and huge selling) straw bale book - no details beyond he made it clear to me on another place that all I did was "buy his book, read it, and steal it for my own - and that if I had integrity, I would have turned my publisher down and not signed the contract to write it, because a perfectly good book was already out there".

Of course, I did buy his book, read it, critically assess it, do the research and give the process a thorough test for two seasons - then wrote my version based on what I observed. So, if not apples and oranges, maybe two varieties of apples.

It raises something interesting I am learning in this garden writin' business. It is a mine field. People are really protective of their areas of expertise. Of course, if the whole thing of turf is extrapolated, we'd have very, very few books out there. We who write are there to teach, coach, inspire. Every person to tackles a subject should be able to evolve it forward as we learn more, and as writers share their own particular experiences. Or, at least that's the ideal as I think it should be. Silly me!
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Old January 23, 2016   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nctomatoman View Post
I am in a bit of a kerfuffle with the author of the previous (and huge selling) straw bale book - no details beyond he made it clear to me on another place that all I did was "buy his book, read it, and steal it for my own - and that if I had integrity, I would have turned my publisher down and not signed the contract to write it, because a perfectly good book was already out there".

It raises something interesting I am learning in this garden writin' business. It is a mine field. People are really protective of their areas of expertise. Of course, if the whole thing of turf is extrapolated, we'd have very, very few books out there. We who write are there to teach, coach, inspire. Every person to tackles a subject should be able to evolve it forward as we learn more, and as writers share their own particular experiences. Or, at least that's the ideal as I think it should be. Silly me!
I haven't read your new one yet Craig, but it's on my list. I love Epic tomatoes and have re-read parts many times. Admittedly straw bale gardening seems interesting, but I'm good with my raised beds/buckets so it's not as high on my list as it would be for others wanting to go down that route.

Good luck with dodging mines, sounds like the other author has some self-insecurity issues. It kind of sounds like scientific research territorial stuff like I've dealt with in my career.
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Old January 23, 2016   #7
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Not to mention we as human's choose others to be our teachers. I have a feeling I would rather buy books from Craig who shows patience, honestly, admiration, commitment, and supportive; than another author who seems to be only able to spit out accusations.

There's only "So much" knowledge out there currently discovered. You are going to have overlap. And when talking about an "idea" such as straw bale gardening, you are going to have even more overlap than on a broader subject.

Sorry someone is ruining a great moment for you Craig. Speaks more aboit him than he would probably like.
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Old January 23, 2016   #8
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Thanks, Raiquee - not really ruining it at all (it is really just a minor effort in the grand scheme of things - another chance to reach gardeners), but I am surprised at how much "wisdom" one can accumulate when venturing out a bit into the world of social networking, feedback loops, boundaries.

My view is all of this is a learning process, toward no real, tangible goal except to keep doing what arises before me. I have a sense that we are all intended to go down particular paths - if we dare open our minds and feelings to what they suggest we do!

Don't worry - I have no plans on a book combining gardening, tomatoes, and philosophy (or...wait!)...

have a great day!
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Old January 23, 2016   #9
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Craig, there was a thread about straw bale gardening at idig after your book came out and there were several who said there already were many books about that and what was the need for a new one, blah blah, etc.

All to say, why don't you PM me the name of the kerfuffle person and I can try to find that thread and get back to you via PM and tell you if kerfuffle person's book was one of them.

Just curiousity.

Carolyn
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Old January 23, 2016   #10
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The individual seems to have an issue with EVERYONE who writes on the subject. Most every book on the matter at Amazon has a 1-star review from this fellow. Not something worth loosing any sleep over... in my opinion.

I'm still reading over my copy... (Thanks Craig!) and will post an honest review when done. However, I've already noticed a key aspect to Craig's book that justifies the "need for a new one" on this subject. Similar to Epic Tomatoes, this book gives an accurate and reliable impression of what to expect when using this method to grow vegetables. It sets a realistic threshold of expectations and how to achieve those, rather than claiming miraculous results with minimal effort. A refreshing tone and much appreciated!

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Old January 23, 2016   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee View Post
The individual seems to have an issue with EVERYONE who writes on the subject. Most every book on the matter at Amazon has a 1-star review from this fellow. Not something worth loosing any sleep over... in my opinion.

I'm still reading over my copy... (Thanks Craig!) and will post an honest review when done. However, I've already noticed a key aspect to Craig's book that justifies the "need for a new one" on this subject. Similar to Epic Tomatoes, this book gives an accurate and reliable impression of what to expect when using this method to grow vegetables. It sets a realistic threshold of expectations and how to achieve those, rather than claiming miraculous results with minimal effort. A refreshing tone and much appreciated!

Lee
Lee I'm glad you posted the above b/c I don't know the name of the kerfuffle person and you do, so I won't bother trying to find out who it is, just trying to help.

Carolyn
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Old January 23, 2016   #12
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Thanks, Carolyn and thanks, Lee. There really is no need to do anything - these situations alleviate themselves over time as they are supposed to.

It raises an interesting topic that is not often considered, communicated, or discussed with books - particularly non-fiction books. There are general topics, and each person - indeed, every person who is an avid tomato grower or anything grower for that matter - will have a unique take on a topic - their take, which could mean added depth, breadth, or even some breakthroughs.

To me, it is the difference between doing this solely for the money, or doing it to learn and coach and teach. I've just only been in this new realm for awhile, and am still learning not only the boundaries, but the characters and the personalities.

The Internet is, as I've said for years, the wild wild west - it provides voices for everyone. People are free to use those voices however they wish.

I appreciate your support here, folks. Thanks.
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Old January 23, 2016   #13
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Lol, has he ever been in a bookstore? Ridiculous... There are probably 20 books at my local B&N on gardening, and several on specifically straw bale gardening. He needs to face reality, but I digress. I enjoyed your first book Craig and look forward to checking out the new one. Good luck!
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Old January 23, 2016   #14
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Guy sounds like a jerk.

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Old January 24, 2016   #15
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Hi Craig, I was at our local library and saw your book on tomatoes and immediately checked it out...the spine was not even broken on it yet! Lovingly I opened it and massaged the spine while getting a few pages opened at time like my teacher wife said how to do it...really really enjoyed the book and will be buying a copy soon. I look forward to reading your treatise on straw bale gardening. I read the author in question and didn't like his 'tone' and knowing how you write will be a pleasure to read.
I see you will be in Seattle for the flower and Garden show. Will you be staying with relatives? (some where I saw you mentioned your sister still lives here...) I hope to go and be part of the audience...The weather has been getting better in Seattle area for growing late to maturity tomatoes like heirlooms that need longer heat units if only having less than 8 hours of sunshine on them. Any opinions on growing tomatoes in the PacNowest? I remember something in your book but don't recall off hand...yeah, I should have bought it!

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