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Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

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Old September 19, 2016   #16
kath
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Linda, I bought one several years ago and was disappointed in its performance when straining thawed raw tomatoes. It does go much more smoothly using cooked tomatoes.

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Old September 19, 2016   #17
clkeiper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labradors2 View Post
Thanks for all the comments. I've heard that the new Victorio's aren't as good as the old ones, which could be the reason for all the glowing comments, of which there are many, and the reason that I bought one. It's also interesting that some people cook their tomatoes first and find it easier.

Linda
You know there may be truth to that... mine is really old. the original Victorio plant burned to the ground several years ago and another company picked it up and is remanufacturing them.. if I recall correctly. I don't think it is actually "victorio" anymore, just their name.
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Old September 19, 2016   #18
Randall
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I have an old Victorio from the early 80's I inherited from my Grandmother. It's a quality piece of equipment. I've used it with Tomatoes, Apples, Berries, etc. and it always does a top notch job. I've never put anything frozen through it but I bet it wouldn't like it.
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Old September 19, 2016   #19
ContainerTed
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When I read the reply by TomNJ, that's was what came to my mind while reading the initial post. I have the Back To Basics Food Mill (same as the Victorio) and here's what I've learned over the last 9 years.

1. If you cut the raw tomatoes up into smaller pieces, then the skins will not be so quick to clog up the little holes in the strainer.

2. If you freeze raw tomatoes, then they will tend to clog up the screen hole faster.

3. For me, about 8 quarts of raw, uncooked, unfrozen tomato chunks can be done and then simply remove the strainer screen and clean out the pieces of skin that are clogging the screen holes.

4. If you skin the tomatoes first, and then make sure there are only small pieces of "core" material left, you can process about 50 quarts of chunks before having to clean out the screen.

5. It works the same for apples. I made 18 pints of applesauce this year.

6. I run the skins back thru to make sure I get all the good stuff. I can then save the seeds if I want to. I used to do this for Wintersown and would send Trudi a couple of pounds of mixed seeds each year.

7. The apple/tomato screen won't properly do grapes, and vice-versa. The tomato screen will actually grind up grape seeds. This is because the seeds of the grapes are round and the clearance thru the squeeze area is not enough to let the round seeds thru without crunching.

So, if you want an inexpensive device that will do the job, but requires a little more upkeep, then you save on the initial money spent. I personally think the manufacturer intends that the tomatoes be skinned first. Then there is little or nothing to clog the screen holes.
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Old September 19, 2016   #20
MarianneW
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Interesting. I bought one earlier this year and have used it a few times. I've run unpeeled, raw, frozen tomatoes through it with no issues, but I only made probably 4-5 cups of tomatoes. My struggle was disassembly until I figured out how it should be taken apart.
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Old September 19, 2016   #21
Labradors2
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Wow! I want an OLD Victorio like Randall's!

Ted. Thanks for all the info. You saved me some aggro because I bought a grape spiral, but not a grape screen so I guess I will need to get one before attempting to run grapes through it.

It seems logical that cutting tomatoes in small pieces would prevent jam ups. Good point. I was wondering if scraping the guck from around the screen would also prevent jams. It seemed to stop the liquid from oozing out of the side I thought.

Marianne, I too panicked when at first I couldn't get the spiral out of the screen, then I discovered that simply wiggling it did the trick to free it up. Phew!

Linda
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Old September 19, 2016   #22
Worth1
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It took some looking but the new ones are made in Taiwan.
This doesn't mean it is bad just sad.
Parboiling the tomatoes will give you a better product anyway.
http://victorio.info/food-strainer-use-video.html

http://www.victorioproducts.com/prod...-accessory-kit
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Old September 19, 2016   #23
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Also why on earth they call it a spiral is beyond me.
It is more accurately an Archimedes screw.

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Old September 19, 2016   #24
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I choose to use raw tomatoes with the skins still on to do my juice. The price I pay for that is that I have to clean up the screen a bit more often. For me, it is just a part of the procedure that I developed that gives me the product I prefer.

I do that cleanup more often and that means I don't have to boil anything until I have my raw juice.

I am only making juice in the mid to late summer, so I can use my garden hose (right outside the kitchen door) to blast the screen clean in about 20 seconds.

I like the aroma of freshly squeezed tomatoes and use this as a quality check just before I apply the heat to the pots and begin reducing the water from the juice.

I remove the screen and the big red plastic screw and any tomato skins/meat under the feed area of the food mill. This is put aside for later use. After blasting things clean, I feed everything that falls out of the food mill back into the mill to make sure nothing is wasted. I guess I've decided that this is the price for producing a good product which will be delicious January and February come around.

I've often thought that I would have to clean out the screen even if I had an electric model that would eliminate my having to work out on the hand crank to get the juice. I also have decided that while I can easily afford one of the 250 dollar plus models, I'm not sure I would use it enough to justify the expense. I make tomato juice and applesauce during a short time period each year. What would the electric model being doing during the rest of the time except what the non-electric model is doing at the same time?

So, that's my cut on it. My $57 Back To Basics Food Mill, with its manual crank fills my needs. It also allows me to feel like I have a more "hands on" feeling about the making of my tomato juice or applesauce.

BTW, if you can make applesauce, you're only a couple of ingredients and a couple of steps away from "Apple Butter". Yes, it's easy/smeazy.

Have a good one.
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Old September 19, 2016   #25
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I bought one last year and used it a lot, but what I find is faster for me when making salsa is to just halve my maters and put them cut side down in a roasting pan/dish and broil for 5-10 min on the top rack. The skin comes off easily after. Then it all goes into the food processor. I don't really use tomato juice and for me the victorio made way to much juice, even when I was saving seeds. Roasting keeps most of the good stuff in the mater and is less work for me. I like the taste of jalapenos done the same way.
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Old October 4, 2016   #26
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I tried using an Italian tomato press. I hated it and gave it away.

I found a masticating juicer worked great. They are also called Slow Juicers. They have high pulp juice, which means it made tomato sauce. I chopped up the tomatoes, threw them in my Fagor Slow Platino Juicer, and got sauce.

No cooking, no pushing, and no straining.
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Old October 4, 2016   #27
Labradors2
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I finally broke down and used the Victorio to process some Concord-type grapes. I had bought a grape spiral and was all set. I also put hubby in charge, in case I was assembling it wrong

We prepped the grapes and I cooked them first, since the Victorio seems to prefer things to be mushy. At first it was a cinch to feed a big bowlful of grapes through, then the difficulties began with some clogging. After clearing the blockage, hubby eventually put another big bowlful through before he had some major difficulty, so he didn't re-feed the skins and seeds.

He discovered that a small washer had disappeared (hopefully with the seeds). It's lack caused the handle to go in too far, and maybe also caused the handle to fall out frequently too. He has now obtained several spares.

We canned 15 jars of grape syrup

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Old October 19, 2016   #28
Spike2
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WOW I need to upgrade!! I use one of these:

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Old October 19, 2016   #29
Labradors2
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Maybe not Spike. There's not much to go wrong there!

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Old October 19, 2016   #30
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And a lot to like! Won't drip on the counter (if you put a bowl in the right place )
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