Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 9, 2016   #1
gsnader
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Posts: 7
Default Thoughts on Tomato Varieties for Canning

Hi All,

Every year I can about two bushels of tomatoes for my family. After a few years of gardening I have yet to get all of those tomatoes from my own garden. I grow heirloom tomatoes and was wondering if this wonderful group would have any thoughts on good varieties to grow for canning purposes. I am looking for a tomato (preferably OP but am open to trying a hybrid) that is high yielding with a good general tomato flavor. I have plenty of very flavorful tomatoes and would prefer to eat them fresh. I live in Pennsylvania. I've seen Costoluto Genovese mentioned as a good variety for canning, any other thoughts? Thank you!
gsnader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #2
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,358
Default

You might try some hearts. They tend to be meaty, with few seeds, and they also tend to yield well. There are a lot of red oxheart types. I like Wes and George Detsikas Italian Red. Anna Maria's Heart is a very good pink.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #3
TomNJ
Tomatovillian™
 
TomNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Floyd VA
Posts: 644
Default

Kosovo is a staple in my garden for canning. It is a large, meaty and tasty heart with very little scabs, cracks or core, perfect for canning. It is also one of the earliest and most productive tomatoes I have grown, last year averaging 22 pounds per plant.

TomNJVA
TomNJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #4
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 957
Default

Paste tomatoes
Big Mama F1
Olpalka
San Marzano

Hearts
Wes
Japanese Oxheart
George Detsikas
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #5
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,596
Default

Use excellent tasting varieties, if they are juicy just cook them down. We do a 100 quarts of spaghetti sauce, and about the same of tomato slop. We found that great tasting varieties taste really good coming out of those jars in mid winter.
We have used all Brandywine, all Early Girl, all Chapman, etc, etc, and many mixes of varieties, it really is worth the time to use the best. Been at this for sometime too.
AKmark is online now   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #6
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,709
Default

I have to agree Mark. For several years I combined all the tomatoes I grew for salsa/sauce etc and it was amazing. This past season I grew a ton of small roma types and canned almost exclusively with those, the taste was nowhere near what it was when I used w/e I had. I did this because I was selling all of my best tomatoes this year so all I had were red plum and red hybrids left for processing.

On the plus side it was much less work since all the fruit was uniform and thick skinned (easy to peel) but the results were disappointing. That being said some of my favorites are:

Wes
Indian Stripe
Prudens Purple

The best salsa I ever made was these 3 combined. If you save seeds you can get rid of most of the juice before processing anyway so beefsteaks work fine.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #7
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,268
Default

One of the best salsas I have ever had was orange Russian.
Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #8
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,358
Default

The last time I tried to cook down a pot of juicy heirlooms, it sat on the stove too long and oxidized, turned a brownish maroon. I added liquid smoke and called it bbq sauce. I think next time I will let the juice sit in the fridge overnight to separate and pour off the water.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #9
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,268
Default

Sounds like it needed some mineral oil in it.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old December 9, 2016   #10
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,990
Default

I want to can some Porter tomatoes. http://www.tomatogrowers.com/PORTER/productinfo/3139/
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 10, 2016   #11
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,709
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
The last time I tried to cook down a pot of juicy heirlooms, it sat on the stove too long and oxidized, turned a brownish maroon. I added liquid smoke and called it bbq sauce. I think next time I will let the juice sit in the fridge overnight to separate and pour off the water.
That helps a lot. I squeeze all of mine to save the seeds and do the juice into one pot and then process. Then I let the processed puree sit until the thinner liquid separates. Pour that off and it doesn't take that long to get it the way you want it. I found that cutting some chunks to add in at the end helps the consistency as well.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 10, 2016   #12
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,596
Default

BVV, the big beefsteaks are pretty easy to peel after being scalded for a a few seconds, and the slop adds up fast. We are hooked, we are super picky now, only the best go in the jars.
Cole, we cook our for about an hour for slop, but we cook our spaghetti sauce for 6-8 hours, barely simmer the sauce. Put your onion in right away, add the bell peppers about an hour before your done, spice the rest to your style. mmmm
AKmark is online now   Reply With Quote
Old December 10, 2016   #13
Labradors2
Tomatovillian™
 
Labradors2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Ontario
Posts: 2,872
Default

I save all my excess tomatoes in freezer bags in the freezer, then when I'm ready to make sauce, I take out 5 bags. I run them under the hot tap to remove the skins and let them sit in colanders in large coolers for a couple of days. This removes a ton of liquid and reduces the cooking time needed to make sauce.
Labradors2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 10, 2016   #14
gsnader
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Posts: 7
Default

Thank you all, I'm already planning next year's garden and this has given me some great food for thought. I have been growing a variety called German Strawberry that produces huge, meaty fruit that I have enjoyed using for canning. It's yield was always fairly low until we had an uncharacteristically cool summer. That year it cranked out the fruit.
gsnader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 10, 2016   #15
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,709
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKmark View Post
BVV, the big beefsteaks are pretty easy to peel after being scalded for a a few seconds, and the slop adds up fast. We are hooked, we are super picky now, only the best go in the jars.
Cole, we cook our for about an hour for slop, but we cook our spaghetti sauce for 6-8 hours, barely simmer the sauce. Put your onion in right away, add the bell peppers about an hour before your done, spice the rest to your style. mmmm
I did that for years Mark but now I prefer broiling them, halved, skin side up. It really reduces the water content compared to the hot water method, but it also makes the kitchen hot as hell. I just liked it better as it is less work with straining and cooking down, but be ready to sweat if your doing a lot You can see the skins to the corner in the 2nd pic. They just peel right off after 5 mins in oven.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg rsz_1469409062864.jpg (12.7 KB, 78 views)
File Type: jpg rsz_1469387698615.jpg (12.5 KB, 79 views)
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:40 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★