Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 26, 2016   #1
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,358
Default Hanging tomatoes for storage

I'd like to learn how to tie up storage tomatoes like the pics below. If anyone has ever hung their tomatoes to store and tied them up somehow, I would love to hear how you do it. I'm a little unclear on the best methods and materials to use. My goal is to be able to sell trussed-up tomatoes at fall markets next year, so I need to be able to create an attractive product.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg colgar79u.JPG (169.9 KB, 141 views)
File Type: jpg colgarhanging.jpg (235.3 KB, 144 views)
File Type: jpg decolgartrusses.JPG (96.3 KB, 142 views)
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26, 2016   #2
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,268
Default

At your service.

http://tomatoville.com/showthread.ph...ghlight=Ristra
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old December 26, 2016   #3
Ricky Shaw
Tomatovillian™
 
Ricky Shaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Zone 6a Denver North Metro
Posts: 1,856
Default

Looks very cool. Everybody's got tomatoes that time of year, this would stand out.
Ricky Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26, 2016   #4
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,990
Default

When I saw the title, it made me think about the A Grappoli varieties I grew this year. The RKN got them before I got a chance to try hanging them. But I did get to save a lot of seeds.

Those ristras look cool.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26, 2016   #5
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,268
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
When I saw the title, it made me think about the A Grappoli varieties I grew this year. The RKN got them before I got a chance to try hanging them. But I did get to save a lot of seeds.

Those ristras look cool.
I would like to lay on a bed of cushions and have a beautiful woman hang them over me so I could eat then one at a time.
Another one fanning me with palm fronds with belly dancers and music too.
worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old December 26, 2016   #6
PhilaGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
PhilaGardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,351
Default

I grew one type of Tomatiga de Ramallet this year and sliced one yesterday in a sandwich. The plants were productive and the fruit have been keeping OK, although I lost a few to mold growth. A shade better than store-bought at this time of year, but very firm. I'll probably keep searching for a better tasting version. Would be neat to tie them in a string and alternate with strings of garlic!
PhilaGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26, 2016   #7
KarenO
Tomatovillian™
 
KarenO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 3,869
Default

Those must be stronger tomato stem attachments than I am used to. I can see it working fine with peppers but to my mind tomatoes separate too easily from their stems to make this work practical
KarenO
KarenO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27, 2016   #8
Gerardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Gerardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: San Diego-Tijuana
Posts: 2,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenO View Post
Those must be stronger tomato stem attachments than I am used to. I can see it working fine with peppers but to my mind tomatoes separate too easily from their stems to make this work practical
KarenO
Some of these De Colgar/Ramallet varieties have VERY strong truss stems where they originate on the main stem, and indeed, on the tomato itself. Much stronger than any multiflora I've encountered, in terms of the originating stem.

I'm growing a few plants (Ramallet Algaida and De Colgar 100, both for seed production) under less than ideal conditions (lows in the 40s, highs in the 80s sometimes) and they are doing well.

So perhaps challenging them towards the end of the season is a possibility.

The best tasting one I've tried thus far is De Colgar Papuo, a beautiful PL plant, prolific, putting out salmon colored 1.5-2.5 inch diameter, good fresh but much better after a month or two, especially spreading it on a slice of bread, just as Ilex recommended.

Dutch has a nice pic of a row of them on CRW
Gerardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27, 2016   #9
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,044
Default

I recognize those first pictures shown, I'm pretty sure from Ilex in Spain who posts here. I've been getting many varieties from him, and yes, some de colgar ones as well.

Also found in Italy and used when refrigeration was not available,so hung up and remained edible for a very long time.

Commonly known as winter tomatoes.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27, 2016   #10
MissMoustache
Tomatovillian™
 
MissMoustache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Cold hardy zone 4b-5a, Heat zone 4-5, Sunset zone 43
Posts: 146
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerardo View Post
Some of these De Colgar/Ramallet varieties have VERY strong truss stems where they originate on the main stem, and indeed, on the tomato itself. Much stronger than any multiflora I've encountered, in terms of the originating stem.

I'm growing a few plants (Ramallet Algaida and De Colgar 100, both for seed production) under less than ideal conditions (lows in the 40s, highs in the 80s sometimes) and they are doing well.

So perhaps challenging them towards the end of the season is a possibility.

The best tasting one I've tried thus far is De Colgar Papuo, a beautiful PL plant, prolific, putting out salmon colored 1.5-2.5 inch diameter, good fresh but much better after a month or two, especially spreading it on a slice of bread, just as Ilex recommended.

Dutch has a nice pic of a row of them on CRW
Oh cool description! Can I ask where you got your seeds for De Colgar Papuo? It sounds like something I want to try (also trying storage melons this year) and I'm about to order my seeds for the year.
__________________
Books, cats, gardening...life is good!
MissMoustache is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27, 2016   #11
Gerardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Gerardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: San Diego-Tijuana
Posts: 2,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MissMoustache View Post
Oh cool description! Can I ask where you got your seeds for De Colgar Papuo? It sounds like something I want to try (also trying storage melons this year) and I'm about to order my seeds for the year.
De Colgar Papuo will be available in Carolyn's upcoming seed offer. If she'll permit me, I can probably send you an early bird envelope. Ilex is the one to thank for sharing this Iberian tomato.
Gerardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28, 2016   #12
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,709
Default

Anyone know what the powdery looking substance is on the tomatoes in the first pic?
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28, 2016   #13
MissMoustache
Tomatovillian™
 
MissMoustache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Cold hardy zone 4b-5a, Heat zone 4-5, Sunset zone 43
Posts: 146
Default

Looks like mold to me
__________________
Books, cats, gardening...life is good!
MissMoustache is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28, 2016   #14
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,358
Default

I would guess sand, dirt, or spray residue. They probably store longer if they are not washed.

The pics all came from a google image search. Here are a few more:



These look like they have spray residue on them:






Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28, 2016   #15
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 1,617
Default

I've been looking at some varieties for storage. Ordered a couple. Might be worth a try.
Years ago i did pull up entire plants and hung in the barn. That was when we had first frosts as early as late August. Not happened in years since, and now first frost is usually mid October. Covering is easy for a light frost.
Some of those look like the grocery varieties i see now. A new one this year, unlike the
Kumato, is Canadian grown and very green/yellow. Large. Ripens slow. I just bought two and one is still firm but turning pink now. Not great but better than most. Seems the Kumato growers are getting lax as they all look old and soft.

Also noticed Kumato is not called that anymore. One grown in Mexico, smaller, the other
grown in Canada, larger like last years, and a cherry, same 'chocolate' color.

Would like a keeper that proves tasty at least holding through the holidays. That seems to be the intent in the pics.
oakley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:41 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★