Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Discussion forum for commercial seed, plant and garden supply sources.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old April 21, 2017   #16
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBig46 View Post
Tania, I think of you. Good luck!
Vladimír
Vladimir, I do think you meant you wanted to thank Tania in her thead,but it ended up here.

As for me and sourcing specific seeds I think others of you have a better chance of doing so,so I'm out.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 21, 2017   #17
MrBig46
Tomatovillian™
 
MrBig46's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Czech republic
Posts: 1,577
Default

Thanks for the warning. I've already fixed it.
Vladimír
MrBig46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 21, 2017   #18
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBig46 View Post
You forgot to mention that you are trading with seeds of rarer varieties. Not directly, but only a participant can get seed (eg Latah) only when attending your training (very expensive). Nobody knows anything about your research.
Vladimír
What is so special about Latah,it and many other early varieties were also bred by Dr.Boe

https://www.google.com/search?q=dr.b...&bih=788&dpr=1

I've grown Latah and don't like it at all,I also grew another one of his called Sandpoint

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Sandpoint

Which I really didn't like at all , seeds from Glenn at Sandhill,and it was a bit a joke between us when I would send him seeds for trial ,he'd ask if anything there that tastes like Sandpoint.

Finally he asked if his wife Linda if she would coat some Latah fruits with dark chocolate and send them to me and I said no,all I would do would be to eat the dark chocolate and leave the rest.

Merek, I checked out your website and very nicely done,here is the link for others if they want to take a look

http://permaseminka.cz/

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22, 2017   #19
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
What is so special about Latah,it and many other early varieties were also bred by Dr.Boe

https://www.google.com/search?q=dr.b...&bih=788&dpr=1

I've grown Latah and don't like it at all,I also grew another one of his called Sandpoint

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Sandpoint

Which I really didn't like at all , seeds from Glenn at Sandhill,and it was a bit a joke between us when I would send him seeds for trial ,he'd ask if anything there that tastes like Sandpoint.

Finally he asked if his wife Linda if she would coat some Latah fruits with dark chocolate and send them to me and I said no,all I would do would be to eat the dark chocolate and leave the rest.

Merek, I checked out your website and very nicely done,here is the link for others if they want to take a look

http://permaseminka.cz/

Carolyn

Thank you, Carolyn.

I firstly met Latah in RealSeed Catalogue where it is described as "It might just be the best early tomato ever. It’s a super-early variety that tolerates short or cool summer..."

So I tested the variety and found it really very early. It is earlier than eg. Stupické polní rané. It takes about 50 days from planting to harvesting first ripen fruits (Stupické polní rané in my conditions takes about 55 days). As I grow tomatoes mostly outside in the garden or in the field and without fungicides, very early varieties can provide me with some fruits before late blight strikes in bad years. The flavor might be inferior but it is the dark side of many early varieties.

Last year I crossed Latah with the Wild Hawaiian tomato (solanum pimpinellifolium) which has the sweetest taste of all tomatoes I have ever tried. My intention is to improve the taste of Latah. I wonder how delicious the F1 generation of this cross shall prove to be:-)
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22, 2017   #20
NarnianGarden
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Finland, EU
Posts: 2,074
Default

Yes, very nice, with plenty of pictures. Your pimpinellifolium crops were impressive.

I have tried two currant tomato varieties -red and yellow - and did not find the taste anything special, so I wonder what the issue was.. (other varieties tasted good under same conditions)
NarnianGarden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22, 2017   #21
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NarnianGarden View Post
Yes, very nice, with plenty of pictures. Your pimpinellifolium crops were impressive.

I have tried two currant tomato varieties -red and yellow - and did not find the taste anything special, so I wonder what the issue was.. (other varieties tasted good under same conditions)
Thank you.

There are many currant tomato (mainly pimpinellifolium) varieties. Some of them have very bad flavor but some are exceptionally delicious!
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22, 2017   #22
NarnianGarden
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Finland, EU
Posts: 2,074
Default

Yes, mine were pimpinellifolium. They were very productive - plenty of fruits indeed -, but the taste was not much worth mentioning. Thankfully, there are countless other cherry toms with exceptional flavor, so I probably won't be tempted with pimpinellifoliums again.
NarnianGarden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 22, 2017   #23
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
Thank you, Carolyn.

I firstly met Latah in RealSeed Catalogue where it is described as "It might just be the best early tomato ever. It’s a super-early variety that tolerates short or cool summer..."

So I tested the variety and found it really very early. It is earlier than eg. Stupické polní rané. It takes about 50 days from planting to harvesting first ripen fruits (Stupické polní rané in my conditions takes about 55 days). As I grow tomatoes mostly outside in the garden or in the field and without fungicides, very early varieties can provide me with some fruits before late blight strikes in bad years. The flavor might be inferior but it is the dark side of many early varieties.

Last year I crossed Latah with the Wild Hawaiian tomato (solanum pimpinellifolium) which has the sweetest taste of all tomatoes I have ever tried. My intention is to improve the taste of Latah. I wonder how delicious the F1 generation of this cross shall prove to be:-)
I've grown 3 of the 4 Stupike ones, two bred for glass house growing and two for outside growing.

But I much prefer

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Matina

or

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Sophie%27s_Choice

The history of how Stupice, as it was called here in the US came here is also interesting, at least to me.

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Stupice

Much of the history shown in the above link there was from Vladimir,also from the Czech Republic as you know.Additional info from Sahin Seeds in the Netherlands from Kes Sahin, whose parent were from Czechkoslovakia. Sahin Seeds was bought out by another Co after Kees passed away.
He could never remember the time difference and would call me at 3 AM with his booming voice to discuss this and that, and yes he also sent me some wonderful dark chocolate from the Netherlands as well.

His passion was really peonies and he had the largest collection of them in the world. I still miss him very much .

About your cross of Latah with a pimp and wondering how delicious the F1 might taste like. Knowing the many pimps I've grown as well as Latah, so you are expecting or hoping for something Delicous? I wouldn't.

Are you going to try to maintain it as an F1,or are you going to save seeds and see how genetic segregation might work out for you with additional plant outs?

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24, 2017   #24
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NarnianGarden View Post
Yes, mine were pimpinellifolium. They were very productive - plenty of fruits indeed -, but the taste was not much worth mentioning. Thankfully, there are countless other cherry toms with exceptional flavor, so I probably won't be tempted with pimpinellifoliums again.
Which cherry variety do you think is the most delicious? Which is your favourite? I would like to compare it with my supersweet Hawaiian currant pimpinellifolium tomato:-)
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24, 2017   #25
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
I've grown 3 of the 4 Stupike ones, two bred for glass house growing and two for outside growing.

But I much prefer

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Matina

or

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Sophie%27s_Choice

The history of how Stupice, as it was called here in the US came here is also interesting, at least to me.

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Stupice

Much of the history shown in the above link there was from Vladimir,also from the Czech Republic as you know.Additional info from Sahin Seeds in the Netherlands from Kes Sahin, whose parent were from Czechkoslovakia. Sahin Seeds was bought out by another Co after Kees passed away.
He could never remember the time difference and would call me at 3 AM with his booming voice to discuss this and that, and yes he also sent me some wonderful dark chocolate from the Netherlands as well.

His passion was really peonies and he had the largest collection of them in the world. I still miss him very much .

About your cross of Latah with a pimp and wondering how delicious the F1 might taste like. Knowing the many pimps I've grown as well as Latah, so you are expecting or hoping for something Delicous? I wouldn't.

Are you going to try to maintain it as an F1,or are you going to save seeds and see how genetic segregation might work out for you with additional plant outs?

Carolyn
So Matina is your favourite one between early varieties?

Stupice is favourite of Carol Deppe who writes about the variety in her books The Resilient Gardener (now translated to czech) and The Tao of Vegetable Gardening. It is fascinating to see how more than half century old czechoslovakian variety is still valued in the world:-)

Yes, I am expecting and hoping something delicious will arise from my cross, because the pimp Hawaiian currant involved in the cross is exceptionally sweet tomato. My intention is to select the new stable variety with as much earliness and flavour as possible
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24, 2017   #26
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
Which cherry variety do you think is the most delicious? Which is your favourite? I would like to compare it with my supersweet Hawaiian currant pimpinellifolium tomato:-)
http://t.tatianastomatobase.com:88/w...b=General_Info

There already is a very long thread in General Discussion where folks listed the cherry sized tomatoes they like best.

I'd link to it but now that I've started this post I don't want to lose it to go get another link.

And Glenn Drowns at Sandhill Preservation also lists it,but no seeds available for 2017. He lists a few other currants as well.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24, 2017   #27
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
http://t.tatianastomatobase.com:88/w...b=General_Info

There already is a very long thread in General Discussion where folks listed the cherry sized tomatoes they like best.

I'd link to it but now that I've started this post I don't want to lose it to go get another link.

And Glenn Drowns at Sandhill Preservation also lists it,but no seeds available for 2017. He lists a few other currants as well.

Carolyn
Is it this thread?

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=38470
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24, 2017   #28
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
Yes, thank you.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 25, 2017   #29
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Interesting article about the disappearing population of pimpinellifoliums in Peru and about difficulties with saving them:

"The second problem facing scientists such as Chetelat is purely political. Beginning in 1992, members of the United Nations approved a treaty called the Convention on Biological Diversity. It established international regulations on the exploitation of genetic resources, including seeds and plants. If researchers from one nation want to use biological resources from another nation, they must first get its consent and fully inform the donor country about what they plan to do with the material. A corporation or university that profits from use of the biological resources must share the money equitably with the country of origin.

Every single member of the UN but one ratified the treaty, the notable exception being the United States. “Before, you could just take the seeds out of the country and distribute them to researchers and breeders,” Chetelat said. “Now you need prior consent to go in and collect. Then you need a separate permit to export the seeds out of the country. Finally, you have to negotiate an agreement about how you would share any benefits that arise from any seed distribution. It has been impossible to negotiate such agreements with Peru.” Chetelat said he wouldn’t be as concerned if the government of Peru or university scientists there were actively collecting and properly storing wild tomato seeds, similar to the way the country has assembled native potato varieties at its International Potato Center. But Chetelat said that is not being done.

In the meantime, industrial agriculture continues to overtake former pimp habitat. Chetelat is particularly troubled about northern Peru, the area where pimpinellifolium populations are at their most diverse. “With the agricultural development, we’ve already lost populations we wanted to collect. And the worst thing is that we really don’t know what we are losing,” he said."


Why Is This Wild, Pea-Sized Tomato So Important?
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 25, 2017   #30
ddsack
Tomatovillian™
 
ddsack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern Minnesota - zone 3
Posts: 2,619
Default

What a nicely written article! I had some vague knowledge of this, but had not thought about the wild tomatoes much. Thanks for the link!
__________________
Dee

**************
ddsack is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:10 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★