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Old August 1, 2017   #16
Rajun Gardener
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There should be an infomercial for this.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6oxdGvGbNrE
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Old August 1, 2017   #17
SueCT
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my other favorite corn recipe, Corn Salad (I tried it both ways and prefer to leave out the vinegar):




2 teaspoons olive oil

3 slices bacon (about 2 ounces), cut crosswise into 1/2 inch pieces

1 Yukon gold potato, about 8 ounces (or other if you prefer), peeled and cut into 1/2 inch dice

1 red bell pepper, ribs and seeds discarded, cut into 1/2 inch dice coarse salt

6 ears of corn, shucked and kernels scraped from cob with a knife (3 cups)

1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

red pepper flakes

Instructions

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-low. Add the bacon and cook until crisp, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel to drain. Measure the fat remaining in the skillet – you need 2 tablespoons (if the bacon was particularly lean and you don’t have enough, add olive oil to make up the difference.)

Add the potato to the skillet and cook, tossing occasionally until they are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Add the bell pepper, season with salt, and cook, tossing occasionally until the pepper and potato are tender, about 5 minutes longer. Add the corn and cook until piping hot, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Add the onion, vinegar, season with salt and red pepper and stir to combine. Serve warm, at room temperature, or chilled.
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Old August 1, 2017   #18
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
There should be an infomercial for this.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6oxdGvGbNrE
Too many steps for one person to do at once for one ear of corn.
Plus it is creamed corn.
A good ole time corn husking and some old ladies with sharp knives is what you need.
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Old August 2, 2017   #19
Father'sDaughter
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I'd go with a good sharp knife, a bowl ( or bundt pan), and a bit of practice. And all the husking would be done outside.
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Old August 2, 2017   #20
ddsack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Too many steps for one person to do at once for one ear of corn.
Plus it is creamed corn.
A good ole time corn husking and some old ladies with sharp knives is what you need.
Right on, Worth! Plus I can't imagine how tired my wrist would get hanging on to that drill for 50 ears of corn, which what I normally process at a time. And I don't like creamed corn!
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Old August 2, 2017   #21
Worth1
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You have to have an assembly line just like building a car or anything else.
Huskers, silkers, cutters and cob scrapers.
I was a husker, my father the silker and my mom the cutter.
My sister was looking at Coed and Teen Magazine.
Only because I sneaked in 4 long rows of sweet corn in the garden.
What the hell is that coming up?
Sweet corn.
What about the green beans?
We already have too many green beans.
Well you're going to take care of it.
The long cob stem can be left on and it becomes the handle to hold while cutting off corn with the knife.
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Old August 3, 2017   #22
nickel plate
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Hey folks-let's get this thread back on track-LOOKING FOR A WORKING GOOD CORN COB KERNEL EXTRACTING TOOL OTHER THAN YOUR EVERYDAY MAMMA'S KITCHEN KNIFE-please no more recipes, assembly line procedures, lathe extraction, beans, potatoes or cob jelly. Please stick to my subject or start your own thread. Jeeze...
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Old August 3, 2017   #23
Worth1
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Your welcome.

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Old August 4, 2017   #24
dmforcier
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Ya. you seem to be missing the spirit of the place.

Wanna borrow my dentures?
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Old August 4, 2017   #25
Father'sDaughter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickel plate View Post
How do you cut blanched corn kernels off of the cob?
I think many of us answered this question by saying, in one way or another, "with a knife."

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickel plate View Post
Do I need to learn the correct way to use the knife ...?

I believe a few of us said yes to this one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickel plate View Post
Do I need to learn the correct way to use the knife or is there another recommended type of mechanical device that I need to know about and purchase?
And I'm betting no one came up with any recommendations because, as we told you in response to your first question, most of us have found it easiest to just do it with a knife.
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Old August 4, 2017   #26
clkeiper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickel plate View Post
Hey folks-let's get this thread back on track-LOOKING FOR A WORKING GOOD CORN COB KERNEL EXTRACTING TOOL OTHER THAN YOUR EVERYDAY MAMMA'S KITCHEN KNIFE-please no more recipes, assembly line procedures, lathe extraction, beans, potatoes or cob jelly. Please stick to my subject or start your own thread. Jeeze...
you have posted 7 times. many of the threads tend to veer off into other topics in a heartbeat. you either have to roll with it or turn off the notifications if it annoys you or find another site that is rigid and stays on topic to the nth degree. that sounds really interesting. mmm hmm.humor is the breath of life. breathe.
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Old August 4, 2017   #27
Worth1
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I went back and read your original post.
If you think a serrated blade is sharper or better than the so called standard knife then that knife isn't sharp.
Next there is no such thing as a standard knife.
The very best all around knife I have and I have around fifty is called a santoku knife.
Farberware makes a good stainless steel one that has good steel and economical to buy.
Get one make it shave and learn how to use it.
If you can't make a knife shave get a ceramic knife.
Worth
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Old August 4, 2017   #28
oakley
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Some things we must do every year are just a time consuming chore.

But I only process a dozen at a time just a few times a season. Seems to be enough for
the Winter months.
I do have the LeeValley tool, but by the time I find it downstairs in the storage drawers
I could be done with a knife and bowl. (so I didn't mention it unless your knife skills are
not so great.)

If I had a boat load to do, I would adopt this method...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yk6KOsIgJKo

Since it involves power tools I could hand off the entire job to others
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Old August 4, 2017   #29
coronabarb
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Let's chill out, nickel plate! We like to converse and have fun here and I see no problem with any of the replies, recipes or not.
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Old August 4, 2017   #30
Barbee
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This is the tool I was talking about
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