Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion about canning and dehydrating tomatoes and other garden vegetables and fruits. DISCLAIMER: SOME RECIPES MAY NOT COMPLY WITH CURRENT FOOD SAFETY GUIDELINES - FOLLOW AT YOUR OWN RISK

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 9, 2006   #16
MsCowpea
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: S. FLorida / Zone 10
Posts: 350
Default

Barb, thanks for the info. A group of experienced people can be a great help--I know I have learned alot from the Harvest forum about canning so I will check out yahoo's FS group.
__________________

"When we kill off the natural enemies of a pest we inherit their work."
Carl Huffaker
MsCowpea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 9, 2006   #17
Bryan24
Tomatovillian™
 
Bryan24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 176
Default

Alton Brown recommended using dry ice for freezing strawberries. Faster freeze time, smaller ice crystals, firmer fruit upon thawing. Wonder if it would work well for tomatos? I may have to try it this year. If I can get slightly firmer fruit upon thawing, I think it would nake better chunky style sauce, no?

laurel-tx
Bryan24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 9, 2006   #18
coronabarb
Tomatoville® Recipe Keeper
 
coronabarb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Roseburg, Oregon - zone 7
Posts: 2,664
Default

farkee,

I would no longer recommend that FS group. There's a real strange weirdo there who jumps down peoples' throats and the owners/mods tolerate him. I'm outta there!

Here's a new Food Saver/food preservation group that can answer questions and they expect everyone to be polite. :wink:

FoodSaverPlus@yahoogroups.com

Barb
coronabarb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27, 2006   #19
Mantis
Tomatovillian™
 
Mantis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oz
Posts: 1,241
Default

Hi folks. Thought I would pull this thread up again as tonight I got some of my frozen tommys out and made a spag bol sauce with them. Just filled up the small sink with hot water from the tap and dropped them in. Left them while I chopped up an onion then pulled them out, peels fell off, cut out core bits and into the pot. Added the usual ingredients and meatballs. The flavour was fresh and wonderful.
The homemade pasta with fresh eggs was gosh darnoodley good as well
Mantis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2007   #20
daylilydude
Tomatovillian™
 
daylilydude's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iuka, Mississippi Zone 7b
Posts: 479
Default Freezing eggplant

Can it be done ? I'm growing more than my 2 plants this year and i don't have a dehydrator (yet!!) so i was wondering if it could be put up in the freezer ?
__________________
Richard
daylilydude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2007   #21
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,237
Default

Try this,
http://web1.msue.msu.edu/imp/mod01/01600697.html

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2007   #22
daylilydude
Tomatovillian™
 
daylilydude's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iuka, Mississippi Zone 7b
Posts: 479
Default

Thanks Worth now i'll be able to have eggplant in the winter!
__________________
Richard
daylilydude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2007   #23
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,237
Default

Your welcome Richard,
I have most of the answers right off of the top of my head but I like to post links to MSU or other reputable sites.
That way it won’t be a wives tale from a hillbilly.
The fruit fresh or citric acid is to keep the food from oxidizing and turning black.
NOT COOL!!
You have to work fast with egg plant.
A trick I use is to lay the stuff I don’t want to stick together out on wax paper in the freezer and let it get semi frozen.
I then put it/them in a zip lock bag, in this way you don’t have anything stuck together.
You can just pick out what you want and seal the bag back up.
I do this with fish, tomatoes, shrimp, pork chops, and just about every thing.
With soups and such you can fill the freezer bag about half full and remove the air.
Then lay the bags down flat and let them freeze.
Then it all goes into the large NOT frost free chest type freezer.
Of course I’m lucky enough to have two refrigerators and one large chest freezer.
It lasts for a very long time.
No worries!
Too bad we can’t freeze melons and have them come out fresh.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 12, 2007   #24
Warren
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kilgore Texas
Posts: 102
Default

I was thinking about using the Dry Ice Method that Alton Brown use to freeze strawberry's.

get and Ice chest and fill the bottom and put dry ice in there. it would freeze the maters (strawberrys) faster. I will see if I can find it for you.

here is what the foodnetwork page says.

Quote:
1 quart strawberries, de-stemmed
1 (3 pound) block dry iceWash strawberries and place in a paper towel-lined colander. Cover with another paper towel and place in the refrigerator for 4 hours. Break your dry ice into small pieces, and toss with berries in a large bowl. Place into a container and cover with a towel. Place this in a cooler for 25 to 30 minutes. Remove berries and put into sealable bags and store in the freezer.
I am still trying to find a video on youtube.

Last edited by Warren; June 12, 2007 at 04:12 AM.
Warren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2010   #25
shlacm
Tomatovillian™
 
shlacm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central VA
Posts: 436
Default

hmmmm... I'm curious about the dry ice method... seems like it would "burn" the tomatoes (or strawberries) if it came into direct contact... Did you ever try it?
shlacm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 30, 2010   #26
FILMNET
Tomatovillian™
 
FILMNET's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Charleston,South Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,805
Default

I used Roma's in the food savers last year, i just put 4-6 clean ones in a bag and froze the bag, then opened the bag to get 1-2 and close the bag with food saves again. Nice
FILMNET is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 9, 2010   #27
gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shlacm View Post
hmmmm... I'm curious about the dry ice method... seems like it would "burn" the tomatoes (or strawberries) if it came into direct contact... Did you ever try it?
No way it would burn the berries. My company sells liquid nitrogen to shrimpers - they freeze the shrimp right on the boats. Considering LIN is at -196 deg Celsius and solid CO2 is at -78 deg Celsius, I can't see a problem.

It is known that liquid nitrogen produces a superior frozen product as it flash freezes foods retaining more moisture and not giving time for ice crystals to form which pierce cell walls and degrade the food. However it is more expensive than "mechanical" refrigeration (like using a conventional Freon type freezer with a compressor)

Just think about it - typical fruit goes in at room temp - 25 C. Normal freezer is 0 deg C. We all know from basic engineering that heat flux is proportional to delta T - that is why it costs more to heat your house in the dead of winter than a cool fall day.

Conventional freezer - delta T is 25 C
Dry ice - delta T is 105 C
LIN delta T is 225 C

Thus LIN has the capability of freezing 10x faster. I make ice cream in 5 minutes using LIN.
gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2012   #28
Ted Posey
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Rainbow City, Al.
Posts: 6
Default

We have never tried freezing whole tomatos or even quartered ones. Maybe they will taste more like fresh.
We dump our toms into boiling hot water for a minute or so to split the peel, Then cool quickly. Peeling slips right off easily. We then cube them and pareboil a few minutes before dipping into freezer bags. We have found 3 yr old bags in the bottom of the chest freezer that had slight freezer burn but still made excellent spaghetti.
My frozen tomatoes taste almost identical to canned, not like the fresh which may be what was meant by "Off Taste" .
Ted Posey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2015   #29
lrussillo
Tomatovillian™
 
lrussillo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: virginia
Posts: 57
Default

Me too. The best to freeze are plums tomatoes. I'll pop a few out and throw them in my lunch salad in the am--by lunch time the tomatoes have defrosted and mixed with the oil and vinegar in the salad--no texture of course--but great fresh tomato flavor. I've concluded that with the others, it is best to cook them down and freeze. In April and May, when I am crazy for a fresh tomato, I pour the cooked-down tomatoes on my eggs--on cheese sandwiches to toast--into my salad...now where is my straw???
lrussillo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2015   #30
pauldavid
Tomatovillian™
 
pauldavid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NE Louisiana, Zone 8A
Posts: 1,185
Default

I froze and canned tomatoes last year. The frozen ones are good in soups and Mexican dishes. I made spaghetti sauce using canned tomatoes and my wife and I loved that spaghetti!
pauldavid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:50 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★