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Old March 5, 2010   #1
tjg911
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Default ramps

ramps are wild alliums, i considered them garlic some sites say onions or leeks. they grow a tiny bulb but are cut for their greens. the leaves look nothing like garlic plants or onions, see links for pictures. ramps have a great garlicly taste. you'll find them in the woods, moist rich woodlands with dappled shading from bare trees growing in clumps, where you see some you'll see a lot. you should cut them don't pull them because the bulb is tiny and by leaving the bulb they grow back. i'm not sure of their range but they are in new england and down south in the carolinas. they appear aound early april here and last about 3 weeks then they are gone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_tricoccum

http://theforagerpress.com/fieldguide/aprilfd.htm
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Old March 5, 2010   #2
mensplace
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It must be easy to preserve ramps as they are always plentiful at the NC State Farmers Market in Asheville, NC pickled whole in jars. I have never dared to eat them as the vendors always give strong warnings as to how powerful they are. Most there come from the wilds of the NC mountains where they are wild and plentiful. Evidently a powerful spring tonic. While an allium, they are not an onion, leek or garlic, but probably closely related. Up there, the folks eat the whole plant. The vendors say you can smell them right through the jar...and they are right. Knowing how I smell the day after eating onions or garlics, I can't even imagine daring one of those little bombs.

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Originally Posted by tjg911 View Post
ramps are wild alliums, i considered them garlic some sites say onions or leeks. they grow a tiny bulb but are cut for their greens. the leaves look nothing like garlic plants or onions, see links for pictures. ramps have a great garlicly taste. you'll find them in the woods, moist rich woodlands with dappled shading from bare trees growing in clumps, where you see some you'll see a lot. you should cut them don't pull them because the bulb is tiny and by leaving the bulb they grow back. i'm not sure of their range but they are in new england and down south in the carolinas. they appear aound early april here and last about 3 weeks then they are gone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_tricoccum

http://theforagerpress.com/fieldguide/aprilfd.htm
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Old March 5, 2010   #3
Tormato
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Another thread is here...

www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=8021

They have a very strong odor, but the taste is milder. Kind of a cross between garlic and onion. I don't know about the greens, I eat the bulb. I prefer them over all other types of alliums that I've tried.

To get to my local patch, I have to cross an icy stream, plod through the muddy seeps, and then climb half-way up a steep rocky ravine.
It's wrth it.

Tormato
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Old March 5, 2010   #4
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http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-133.html

Cultivation of ramps
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Old March 5, 2010   #5
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I love ramps, and they are terrific with potatoes. Haven't had any in many, many years, though. I used to go ramp hunting when I was growing up in West Virginia. I don't know if they can be found growing wild in Texas, or if they would even grow here at all. I am definitely tempted to try, though.
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Old March 6, 2010   #6
GunnarSK
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Those are basically wild onions or garlic growing in the woods. I know a species from Denmark called ramsløg, and my mother grows them in her garden as well. They are quite tasty, and mostly you eat only the greens.
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Old March 12, 2010   #7
yopper
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HI. TIG911 Here I am!!!! I had ramps growing in my woods when I lived in Ohio they also grow here on the island.People up here pickel them.If you haven't belched a ramp belch ya don't know what your missing. for more information than you want. google cosby ramp festival
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Old March 13, 2010   #8
tjg911
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hi yopper,

please read and post your all your allium info here at tomatoville.

tom
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Old March 13, 2010   #9
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Welcome aboard Yopper!!! Hope you will stay and help keep this a great place to talk garlic and onions.

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Old April 2, 2010   #10
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They are yammy. I can understand about the mention of them as a tonic. I'm orignally from Moldova and in the fall and winter we did not have a lot of fresh veggies. In March the local markets were flooded with fresh redishes, cukes and ramps. We would make this great spring salad from those, add in cut up boiled eggs and use sour cream for dressing and it was a feast of vitamines. Last year my mother in law took me to a local park to pick them and we gathered so much that we did not know what do with them all. Does anyone know how to preseve them? Can we just freeze them?
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Old April 2, 2010   #11
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In the Asheville, NC farmers market they are abundant, but all pickled in a light vinegar and brine solution then processed and jarred.
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Old April 3, 2010   #12
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www.earthy.com/Ramps_Canning_Freezing_W655.cfm
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