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Old February 21, 2017   #16
jpop
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Thank you Brown. The sauce made above was very similar. Removed core, skin, and majority of seeds. Sauteed onions and garlic in pan, then added into food processor with tomatoes and pulsed to desired consistency. Transferred into pot and added a bay leaf, oregano, a little salt, pepper, garlic granules, onion powder and simmered for app. 30 minutes. Came out great. Never thought of adding beef broth.
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Old February 21, 2017   #17
brownrexx
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Here is the recipe that I use for sauce. Looks like I updated it last year to drain the tomatoes a little differently that I said in my previous posting. However I do prepare tomatoes as I described in my previous post to freeze for use in chili or soup later in the winter. I usually freeze several quarts like this and they have a nice, fresh taste. I don't worry about a few seeds.

I began doing the draining step in my sauce because the sauce would look wonderful but when we put it over pasta, some water always separated out around the edge of the plate. Draining the tomatoes before making the sauce has solved this problem

Italian Sausage Spaghetti Sauce
1 large onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 lb. bulk Italian sausage
4 c. fresh tomatoes, peeled and chopped & drained.
12 oz tomato paste
1 -14 oz can beef broth
1 -14 oz can vegetable broth
1 tbsp. brown sugar
2 tsp. Italian seasoning
1 tsp. salt

Peel tomatoes, chop and cook down for about 20 minutes. Drain in a mesh strainer for 1 hour.
Sauté onion, garlic and sausage until sausage is no longer pink.
Add remaining ingredients and bring to boil.
Reduce heat and simmer 20-30 minutes until tomato chunks have broken down and sauce is smooth and thick.

Makes 3 quarts

Last edited by brownrexx; February 21, 2017 at 07:10 PM.
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Old February 22, 2017   #18
TomNJ
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I have had my Victorio mill for six years now and have processed over 1,500 pounds of tomatoes through it with no problems at all. It saves me hours on large batches, some over 100 pounds of tomatoes, compared to dipping tomatoes in boiling water and skinning by hand. My Victorio, along with my 30 quart All American pressure canner, have made canning a joy instead of a chore.

Here it is in my kitchen with a salsa screen making salsa. I also use finer screens for sauce and juice.

TomNJ/VA
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Old February 22, 2017   #19
jpop
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I have had my Victorio mill for six years now and have processed over 1,500 pounds of tomatoes through it with no problems at all. It saves me hours on large batches, some over 100 pounds of tomatoes, compared to dipping tomatoes in boiling water and skinning by hand. My Victorio, along with my 30 quart All American pressure canner, have made canning a joy instead of a chore.

Here it is in my kitchen with a salsa screen making salsa. I also use finer screens for sauce and juice.

TomNJ/VA
Thank you for the feedback Tom. After hand peeling the skins on even a relatively small quantity of tomatoes I feel that these mills are a must.
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Old February 22, 2017   #20
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Thank you for the feedback Tom. After hand peeling the skins on even a relatively small quantity of tomatoes I feel that these mills are a must.
I dont have one but they are a must.
The more tomatoes you process the more you will appreciate them and even ones with a motor drive.
Time is money or time you could spend doing something else.
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Old February 22, 2017   #21
Father'sDaughter
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Default Homemade tomato sauce

I don't know how my mother did it year after year, but she would can well over 100 quarts using one of those food mills that sits on top of a bowl. I bought one on eBay for cheap money my fist year canning. Torture! And it took forever.

I love my Victorio!
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Old February 22, 2017   #22
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I don't know how my mother did it year after year, but she would can well over 100 quarts using one of those food mills that sits on top of a bowl. I bought one on eBay for cheap money my fist year canning. Torture! And it took forever.

I love my Victorio!
Mine did too and I helped.
Where were you.
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Old February 22, 2017   #23
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Mine did too and I helped.

Where were you.

Worth


Trust me, my sisters and I spent a lot of time turning that handle...
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Old February 22, 2017   #24
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I thought so.
So now you know how she did it, slaves.
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Old February 22, 2017   #25
jpop
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I hear you guys loud and clear on the mill. Worth, I hope to contribute to your fermenting thread this summer. Ordering bunch of pepper seeds this week.
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Old February 22, 2017   #26
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I thought so.
So now you know how she did it, slaves.


Yeah, but we slaves all moved out over 20 years ago and she's still at it... same mill. Although, she has cut back and only does about 80 quarts a year now...
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Old February 23, 2017   #27
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I like Container Teds way of just cooking down the tomato juice to a thicker consistency and canning.
This way a person can do as they please with spices later on.

Worth
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Old February 23, 2017   #28
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I like Container Teds way of just cooking down the tomato juice to a thicker consistency and canning.
This way a person can do as they please with spices later on.

Worth


Canning purée is definitely the way to go if you want more versatility.
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Old February 24, 2017   #29
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I'm overwhelmed at all of the flavors of tomato products on the canned shelf.
All I ever get is puree, paste sometimes crushed and diced.
Never any spiced stuff.
Worth
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Old February 24, 2017   #30
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I prefer to add my own home-grown fresh onions, garlic, peppers, oregano and basil to my sauce before canning while they are still available. If I season a puree in the winter or spring I may have to use frozen or store bought vegetables, which kind of takes the fun out of growing your own.

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