Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old August 27, 2018   #1
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 1,836
Default Industrial Hemp

Appearntly our Govenor just signed a bill today, making it legal to grow industrial hemp in Illinois...
We're can I buy seeds?

Lots of them!

Last edited by pmcgrady; August 27, 2018 at 10:39 PM.
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #2
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,363
Default

The 2014 FArm Bill already did that. Each state then had to change their state laws.
It still made it hard though. You had to have your states department of ag and univ. Extension come up with rules etc and have other stuff passed that regulates the whole process.
Then you had to register through the process they came up with and pay a small license fee. Other states have completed this process, with Illinois being the latest.
There was talk about making it truly legal in the current discussions of the new farm bill.
You will still have to go through all the BS as though it’s a criminal act and you are trying to get permission for it.

Last edited by PureHarvest; August 28, 2018 at 08:28 AM.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #3
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.
Posts: 38,429
Default

You have to bring the seeds in question to the place of permitting.
If they decide not to arrest you then you will get the permit.
Having the seeds without the permit is grounds for arrest.

Worth
__________________
A Falling Knife Has No Handle

Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #4
seaeagle
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: virginia
Posts: 620
Default

Makes you wonder why this miraculous plant was banned in the first place. It doesn't make you high like the real cannabis plant and it can replace so many things such as medicines, gasoline , synthetic fibers and paper just to name a few


Henry Ford even made a car out of Hemp Fiber reported stronger than steel and fueled it with fuel made from Hemp.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srgE6Tzi3Lg


The answer as to why it was banned is an easy one

Last edited by seaeagle; August 28, 2018 at 01:06 PM.
seaeagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #5
Tormato
Tomatovillian™
 
Tormato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 4,593
Default

This is not meant to be religious, nor political, but...



in the context of Marbury v Madison...
Genesis 1:29...(EVERY seed bearing herb)

and the free exercise clause of Article 1...


...it appears any such laws are null and void, but currently are not considered so, because We The People are clueless.



And please, no religious or political comments.
Tormato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #6
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 1,836
Default

I've got a hemp t shirt I bought over 20 years ago that is still in good shape. It's great for the hot humid weather we have here, it's not like cotton were you feel and are soaking wet, it wicks the moisture away, I should have bought 20 of them.
Maybe that's why hemp diapers are becoming popular.
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #7
carolyn137
Moderator Emeritus
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 21,190
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
Appearntly our Govenor just signed a bill today, making it legal to grow industrial hemp in Illinois...
We're can I buy seeds?

Lots of them!
Same here in NY State,doing it for maybe about 3 years now.

Those interested had to apply to some state office and answer all sorts of questions since only four places to dispense it were allowed

https://www.google.com/search?q=What...&bih=815&dpr=1

Considering the many uses for hemp, as noted in the above link, it's no wonder why so many wanted the franchises.

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&....0.IucL9bNYmzw

No problem getting seeds for hemp as the above links show.


Carolyn, who when she first moved to where she is right now and was growing lots of tomatoes off rt 153 near her,would be picking tomatoes,look up and see a helicopter hovering above her.Told her brother and he said it's just one of the DEC helicopters checking you out to be sure you weren't growing weed. They also flew at night and had some kind of infrared,or whatever,that would make the plants glow. No problem this year since all I have are 10 Bonnie plants out there next to my home that someone else takes care of for me.
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #8
nbardo
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 78
Default

What can an acre of hemp yield? How much does it cost to produce? How much can a farmer sell it for, per acre, at current market rates? What is the total annual global production of hemp? I have heard all the miraculous claims about its beneficial properties but i have never heard these kinds of economic questions asked. If farmers could be making a lot of money growing and selling hemp, it would be more common. If there was an economic engine driving this thing it would have been made legal years ago. It seems very niche.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
nbardo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #9
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 8,377
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
one of the DEC helicopters checking you out to be sure you weren't growing weed. They also flew at night and had some kind of infrared,or whatever,that would make the plants glow.
It's FLIR, which stands for forward looking infrared radar. There was actually a supreme court case over it, and the cops lost. They are not supposed to use it any more without probable cause. I've read the case, and it was a brilliant piece of lawyering. The police are definitely not allowed to look inside your house without a warrant, and the lawyers convinced the court that if someone had poorly insulated walls and was leaning against one, then their image might be visible to the FLIR from outside their home, even though they had a reasonable expectation of privacy. It's a long shot that such a thing would actually happen, but the court bought the argument.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #10
seaeagle
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: virginia
Posts: 620
Default

Good questions and honestly I don't know the answer. But from what I have read it takes little or no pesticides to grow successfully. After all it grows like a weedand will grow almost anywhere. So I would think it would be relatively cheap to grow. With all the potential uses it should demand a good price.


Industrial Hemp was deemed a threat to the Dupont's and other big business at the time. So a scheme was concocted to ban it somehow. This in where the cannabis that makes you stoned comes in.



Make this as short as I can. The powers that be laid out a plan to ban cannabis by conning the American public into thinking that cannabis was public enemy number 1.

It was vicious campaign using the media. Some of the things they said were really racist and cannot be discussed here.


So being that cannabis was such a threat to the USA they lumped industrial hemp in with cannabis saying that no chances should be taken and it should all be banned for public safety.


Here is a short movie trailer that shows the extent these people will go to to get a product of the market that threatens their wealth.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbjHOBJzhb0


Ironically in World War II they legalized it again when the survival of the country was at risk only to ban it again to protect the wealth and big business.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTjHKFTmNYo
seaeagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #11
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,363
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nbardo View Post
What can an acre of hemp yield? How much does it cost to produce? How much can a farmer sell it for, per acre, at current market rates? What is the total annual global production of hemp? I have heard all the miraculous claims about its beneficial properties but i have never heard these kinds of economic questions asked. If farmers could be making a lot of money growing and selling hemp, it would be more common. If there was an economic engine driving this thing it would have been made legal years ago. It seems very niche.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It was not made legal years ago because it would be disruptive to many established markets for fiber, seed oil, animal feed, build materials, human-food grade proteins....
These large corporate gatekeepers are not gonna just let something come in and create competition when there is a convenient, albeit dumb, law in place that protects their space.
As far as economics, in June, it was reported that total sales in the US of hemp products totaled 700 MILLION.
The global market for hemp consists of more than 25,000 products in nine submarkets:
agriculture, textiles, recycling, automotive, furniture, food and beverages, paper, construction
materials, and personal care.
Raw material imports were about 67 million dollars in 2018.
What is the hurdle keeping it nich-like?: Current challenges facing the industry include the need to reestablish agricultural supply chains, breed varieties with modern attributes, upgrade harvesting
equipment, modernize processing and manufacturing, and identify new market opportunities.
Currently, the interstate commerce rules are creating a problem with producers that want to sell seed or protein meal across state lines.
Producers can grow it in approved states, but there needs to be seed dealers, feed processors/pressers, grain handling and storage etc. The companies that can do this are hesitant to invest in the infrastructure because the don't know where they can send and receive until the federal law allows free movement of raw feedstock of seed and fiber, and the movement of finished product.
Without this, farmers are reluctant to grow it if there is no market. Thus we have a vicious catch 22 to get the industry going, hence the push in the 2018 Farm Bill to re-classify hemp as a non-drug so that it will bust open the market.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #12
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,363
Default

As far as the pesticide claim, being that you don't have to spray hemp, that is not the whole story. Nobody sprays hemp because you can't (Legally)!
When it comes to ag production, you can only apply chemicals to crops that are registered on the label for the product. Because there has been no market for hemp, no chemical company has done the research and paid to list hemp as one of the crops their product is labeled to treat.
Hemp would fit into many corn/bean/wheat rotations, and you better believe that a farmer is going to do pre-plant herbicide treatments, and may also have to spray some insecticides to keep defoliating bugs from destroying the crop (think grasshoppers or beetles). Good chance they will also do seed treatments for insects and fungicide. You can argue whether or not these are necessary, but the same case could be made for corn or beans. The point is, unless its organic, the ag industry (product companies and universities) will make sure that hemp is treated just like all other field-scale commodities, and train farmers to grow it just like corn and beans, again, unless its an organic farm. When you're a hammer, everything looks like a nail. This is the agronomy system in the USA 2018, and hemp is not gonna change that.
So, when you read any story touting hemp as an eco-friendly alternative crop that will save the environment, count me as 100% skeptical that it turns out that way.
If the market is truly freed-up, companies will do the research or pay the universities to give their data (which is occurring now) on what they are spraying, how often, and fertilizer rates, seed treatments, fertilizer ect...
If you want to support it to provide a better source of fiber, feed, etc., or that we can provide another market for domestic farmers, that I can agree on.

Last edited by PureHarvest; August 28, 2018 at 04:50 PM.
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #13
imp
Tomatovillian™
 
imp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas
Posts: 4,613
Default

One of the interesting things about hemp I've read, for me, is the use of it to remediate soil that has been contaminated.
imp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #14
seaeagle
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: virginia
Posts: 620
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PureHarvest View Post
As far as the pesticide claim, being that you don't have to spray hemp, that is not the whole story. Nobody sprays hemp because you can't (Legally)!
When it comes to ag production, you can only apply chemicals to crops that are registered on the label for the product. Because there has been no market for hemp, no chemical company has done the research and paid to list hemp as one of the crops their product is labeled to treat.
Hemp would fit into many corn/bean/wheat rotations, and you better believe that a farmer is going to do pre-plant herbicide treatments, and may also have to spray some insecticides to keep defoliating bugs from destroying the crop (think grasshoppers or beetles). Good chance they will also do seed treatments for insects and fungicide. You can argue whether or not these are necessary, but the same case could be made for corn or beans. The point is, unless its organic, the ag industry (product companies and universities) will make sure that hemp is treated just like all other field-scale commodities, and train farmers to grow it just like corn and beans, again, unless its an organic farm. When you're a hammer, everything looks like a nail. This is the agronomy system in the USA 2018, and hemp is not gonna change that.
So, when you read any story touting hemp as an eco-friendly alternative crop that will save the environment, count me as 100% skeptical that it turns out that way.
If the market is truly freed-up, companies will do the research or pay the universities to give their data (which is occurring now) on what they are spraying, how often, and fertilizer rates, seed treatments, fertilizer ect...
If you want to support it to provide a better source of fiber, feed, etc., or that we can provide another market for domestic farmers, that I can agree on.

I know you are right. No doubt it would require many applications of pesticides whether it needed it or not
seaeagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 28, 2018   #15
PureHarvest
Tomatovillian™
 
PureHarvest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mid-Atlantic right on the line of Zone 7a and 7b
Posts: 1,363
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by imp View Post
One of the interesting things about hemp I've read, for me, is the use of it to remediate soil that has been contaminated.
After some brief searching, a question still remains for me on phytoremediation: where do the plant parts that take up the contaminants go?
Some of them are burned for bio-fuel. So I guess they go airborne in the combustion exhaust?
What about the ones that aren’t burned? It cant go into food or feed (legally). Composting it and spreading it would return the problem or move it elsewhere.
So what do they do with the crop that takes it out of the soil?
PureHarvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:30 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★